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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Arthur Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 406 pictures in our Arthur collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Grenadier in Wilton Mews, Where Coachmen Drink No More, c1935. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

The Grenadier in Wilton Mews, Where Coachmen Drink No More, c1935. Creator: Unknown

"The Grenadier" in Wilton Mews, Where Coachmen Drink No More, c1935. Public house in Belgravia, London, built in 1720 as the officers mess for the senior infantry regiment of the British army, the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards. The building was located in a courtyard of their barracks. It opened to the public in 1818 as The Guardsman, and was renamed in honour of the Grenadier Guards actions in the Battle of Waterloo (1815). It was frequented by the Duke of Wellington and King George IV. From "Wonderful London, Volume 3", edited by Arthur St John Adcock. [The Fleetway House, London, c1935]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Creator: Unknown Featured Print

A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Creator: Unknown

A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Man smoking a pipe, and a Blenkinsop steam locomotive at Middleton colliery near Leeds, West Yorkshire. Mining engineer and inventor John Blenkinsop (1783-1831) designed the first practicable steam locomotive, the Salamanca, in 1812. It operated by means of a rack and pinion system. Richard Trevithick had built a steam locomotive in 1805 for Wylam colliery, but it had been too heavy for the cast iron rails it was meant to run on. Middleton colliery laid iron edge rails, which were stronger than those used at Wylam. Blenkinsop went on to build three further locomotives for the colliery, which carried on operating on the railway into the 1830s. In the meantime, further improvements in rail design meant that heavier adhesion locomotives could be used, superseding Blenkinsop's rack and pinion engines. From "British Railways", by Arthur Elton. [Collins, London, 1945]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

War memorials on the battlefield at Waterloo, Belgium, mid 19th century. Creator: Vanderhecht Featured Print

War memorials on the battlefield at Waterloo, Belgium, mid 19th century. Creator: Vanderhecht

War memorials on the battlefield at Waterloo, Belgium, mid 19th century. Monuments on the site of the Battle of Waterloo, fought on 8 June 1815 between Napoleon's forces and a coaltion of the British under the Duke of Wellington, and a Prussian army under Field Marshal Blucher. The Hanoverian Monument (left), was erected in memory of the King's German Legion, a British military unit raised in 1803 on the order of King George III. The Lion's Mound, (centre), marks the place where William II of the Netherlands was knocked from his horse by a musket ball to the shoulder. The Gordon Monument, (right), was erected in memory of Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Alexander Gordon (1786-1815), Aide de Camp to the Duke of Wellington, who was mortally wounded at the very end of the battle

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images