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Images Dated 2018 November

Choose from 1,313 pictures in our Images Dated 2018 November collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Folly Ditch, Jacobs Island, (c1878). Creator: Unknown Featured November Image

Folly Ditch, Jacobs Island, (c1878). Creator: Unknown

Folly Ditch, Jacob's Island, (c1878). Jacob's Island, a notorious slum on the south bank of the River Thames in Bermondsey, London, was made famous in Charles Dickens's novel Oliver Twist. The villain Bill Sikes is chased by police and dies in the mud of Folly Ditch'. From Old and New London: A Narrative of Its History, Its People, And Its Places. The Southern Suburbs, Volume VI, by Edward Walford. [Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., London, Paris & New York, c1878]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

The Embankment, from Charing Cross Bridge, (1881). Creator: Unknown Featured November Image

The Embankment, from Charing Cross Bridge, (1881). Creator: Unknown

The Embankment, from Charing Cross Bridge, (1881). The Embankment Gardens in London were created in 1874, on the reclaimed land on the inward side of the Victoria Embankment next to the River Thames. At left is the York Watergate, built in 1626, which gave access to the Thames from York House, a mansion on the Strand. The building of the Thames Embankment left it 150 yards from the river. From Old and New London: A Narrative of Its History, Its People, and Its Places. Westminster and the Western Suburbs, by Edward Walford, Vol. III. [Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., London, Paris & New York, 1881]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Bridewell as Rebuilt after the Fire, from an old print, (1897). Creator: Unknown Featured November Image

Bridewell as Rebuilt after the Fire, from an old print, (1897). Creator: Unknown

Bridewell as Rebuilt after the Fire, from an old print, (1897). View of Bridewell as it was during the 18th century. Bridewell Palace, on the banks of the Fleet River between Fleet Street and the River Thames, was built as the main London residence of King Henry VIII. Most of the palace was destroyed in the Great Fire of London, and rebuilt in 1666-1667. It was variously an orphanage, place of correction for wayward women, prison, school and a poorhouse. It was closed in 1855. From Old and New London, Volume I, by Walter Thornbury. [Cassell and Company, Limited, London, Paris & Melbourne, 1897]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images