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Images Dated 19th May 2018

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 5860 pictures in our Images Dated 19th May 2018 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Two Short Sunderlands rescuing crew, 1940 Featured 19 May 2018 Print

Two Short Sunderlands rescuing crew, 1940

An artist's impression of two Short Sunderlands rescuing the crew of the torpedoed merchant ship Kensington Court, 1940. On 18th September 1939 Kensington Court was stopped by U-32 with 13 shots of gunfire about 120 miles west of Lands End. The ship later sunk and the master and 34 crew members were rescued by a Sunderland aircraft. The two pilots, F/Lt Thurston M.W. Smith and F/Lt John Barrett were awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) for their feat. The Short S.25 Sunderland was a British flying boat patrol bomber developed for the RAF by Short Brothers. It took its name from the town, later city, of Sunderland in northeast England. From 'Our Air Force' published by Ward, Lock & Co., Ltd., 1940

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'Lord Howard of Effingham', c1600. Artist: Thomas Cockson Featured 19 May 2018 Print

'Lord Howard of Effingham', c1600. Artist: Thomas Cockson

'Lord Howard of Effingham', c1600. Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Nottingham (1536-1624), Earl of Nottingham. The Armada and the English fleet in Cadizin is in the background. Howard (1536-1624) was a first cousin of Queen Elizabeth I and was appointed Lord High Admiral in 1585. He commanded the British fleet against the Spanish Armada and shared the command of the Anglo-Dutch expedition to Cadiz in 1596. In 1597 he was made Earl of Nottingham. After the death of Elizabeth I he continued to serve James I as Lord High Admiral until 1619. From The Connoisseur Volume XCI, edited by F. Gordon Roe. [The Connoisseur Ltd, London, 1933]

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Posters warning those guilty of illegal oaths were liable to deportation', (1834), 1934.. Artist: Unknown Featured 19 May 2018 Print

Posters warning those guilty of illegal oaths were liable to deportation', (1834), 1934.. Artist: Unknown

Posters warning that people found guilty of uttering illegal oaths were liable to deportation', 1834. On 24th February 1834 local landowners in Dorset?put up posters warning that people found guilty of uttering illegal oaths were liable to deportation. The Tolpuddle Martyrs were a group of 19th century agricultural labourers from Dorset who were convicted of swearing a secret oath as members of the Friendly Society of Agricultural Labourers. The rules of the society show it was clearly structured as a friendly society and operated as a trade-specific benefit society. But at the time, friendly societies had strong elements of what would now be considered trade unions. Before 1824/25 the Combination Acts had outlawed 'combining' or organising to gain better working conditions. The Tolpuddle Martyrs were subsequently sentenced to transportation to Australia. Their convictions caused public outcry and 800, 000 signatures were collected for their release. The march organised by thier supporters was one of the first successful political marches in the UK, and all, except James Hammett (who had a previous criminal record for theft) were released in 1836. From 'The Book of The Martyrs of Tolpuddle: 1834-1934', published by The Trades Union Congress General Council, 1934

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