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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Violence Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 354 pictures in our Violence collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Gordon Riots, London, 1780 (1905). Artist: Unknown Featured Print

The Gordon Riots, London, 1780 (1905). Artist: Unknown

The Gordon Riots, London, 1780 (1905). The most destructive riots in London's history, the Gordon Riots began as an anti-Catholic protest against the Papists Act of 1778 led by Lord George Gordon, head of the Protestant Association. The army was eventually deployed onto the streets to restore order, and hundreds of people were shot. From Cassell's History of England, Vol. IV, [Cassell and Company, Limited, London, Paris, New York & Melbourne, 1905]

© The Print Collector

Terrific combat between Richard Coeur de Lion and Saladin, 1850. Artist: John Leech Featured Print

Terrific combat between Richard Coeur de Lion and Saladin, 1850. Artist: John Leech

Terrific combat between Richard Coeur de Lion and Saladin, 1850. A satirical illustration of Richard the Lionheart and Saladin in battle. Richard the Lionheart (1157-1199) was the eldest son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, and second Angevin (Plantagenet) king of England, (1189-1199). During the Third Crusade (1189-1192) Richard led the crusaders against the great Muslim leader, Saladin. After capturing Acre Richard led his army of 30, 000 towards Jaffa (Joppa), on the way defeating the Saracens at Arsuf, 30 miles from Jaffa. From The Comic History of England by Gilbert Abbott A. Beckett, illustrated by John Leech [Bradbury, Agnew & Co., London, 1850.]

© The Print Collector

St Bartholomew's Day Massacre, 1572 (1882-1884). Artist: G Dory Featured Print

St Bartholomew's Day Massacre, 1572 (1882-1884). Artist: G Dory

St Bartholomew's Day Massacre, 1572 (1882-1884). The massacre occurred after a failed attempt by the powerful Catholic Guise family to murder the Huguenot (Protestant) leader Gaspard de Coligny (1519-1572). On 22 August 1572, Coligny was shot but only wounded. Fearing that her part in approving the plot would be discovered, Catherine de Medici, mother of King Charles IX, ordered the killing of the Huguenot leaders, who were gathered in Paris for the wedding of the future King Henry IV. The massacre began on 24 August 1572, and the Huguenot leaders, including Coligny, were killed. Afterwards, the massacre spread to ordinary Huguenots, initially in Paris, but later across much of the country, with Catholic mobs murdering tens of thousands of Protestants. Those who carried out the killings of the Huguenot leaders identified themselves with white armbands and a white cross on their hats. A print from La France et les Francais a Travers les Siecle, Volume II, F Roy editor, A Challamel, Saint-Antoine, 1882-1884.

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images