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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Religious Prejudice Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 48 pictures in our Religious Prejudice collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


St Bartholomews Day Massacre, 1572 (1882-1884). Artist: G Dory Featured Print

St Bartholomews Day Massacre, 1572 (1882-1884). Artist: G Dory

St Bartholomew's Day Massacre, 1572 (1882-1884). The massacre occurred after a failed attempt by the powerful Catholic Guise family to murder the Huguenot (Protestant) leader Gaspard de Coligny (1519-1572). On 22 August 1572, Coligny was shot but only wounded. Fearing that her part in approving the plot would be discovered, Catherine de Medici, mother of King Charles IX, ordered the killing of the Huguenot leaders, who were gathered in Paris for the wedding of the future King Henry IV. The massacre began on 24 August 1572, and the Huguenot leaders, including Coligny, were killed. Afterwards, the massacre spread to ordinary Huguenots, initially in Paris, but later across much of the country, with Catholic mobs murdering tens of thousands of Protestants. Those who carried out the killings of the Huguenot leaders identified themselves with white armbands and a white cross on their hats. A print from La France et les Francais a Travers les Siecle, Volume II, F Roy editor, A Challamel, Saint-Antoine, 1882-1884

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

St Bartholomews Day Massacre, Paris, 24 August 1572 Featured Print

St Bartholomews Day Massacre, Paris, 24 August 1572

St Bartholomew's Day Massacre, Paris, August 1572. The massacre occurred after a failed attempt by the powerful Catholic Guise family to murder the Huguenot (Protestant) leader Gaspard de Coligny (1519-1572). On 22 August 1572, Coligny was shot but only wounded (bottom left). Fearing that her part in approving the plot would be discovered, Catherine de Medici, mother of King Charles IX, who is shown playing tennis (top left), ordered the killing of the Huguenot leaders, who were gathered in Paris for the wedding of the future King Henry IV. The massacre began on 24 August 1572, and the Huguenot leaders, including Coligny, shown (right) being murdered in bed and his body thrown out of a window, were killed. Afterwards, the massacre spread to ordinary Huguenots, initially in Paris, but later across much of the country, with Catholic mobs murdering tens of thousands of Protestants

© Ann Ronan Picture Library / Heritage-Images

Fourth charge at the Battle of Dreux, French Religious Wars, 19 December 1562 (1570). Artist: Jacques Tortorel Featured Print

Fourth charge at the Battle of Dreux, French Religious Wars, 19 December 1562 (1570). Artist: Jacques Tortorel

Fourth charge at the Battle of Dreux, French Religious Wars, 19 December 1562 (1570). The outcome of the battle was indecisive, although notable for the fact that the commanders of both sides, Anne de Montmorency (1493-1567), Constable of France and leader of the Catholic forces and the Huguenot Louis, Prince de Conde (1530-1569) were both taken prisoner. Both sides suffered very heavy casualties, including the Catholic Jacques d'Albon, Marshal Saint-Andre, who was murdered after falling into Huguenot hands. The French Religious Wars between the Catholics and the Protestant Huguenots took place between 1562 and 1598. The conflict ended when Henry IV issued the Edict of Nantes, granting Protestants and Catholics equal rights

© Ann Ronan Picture Library / Heritage-Images