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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Protest Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 94 pictures in our Protest collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Great Native Procession, in New York, 1844. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Great Native Procession, in New York, 1844. Creator: Unknown

Great Native Procession, in New York, 1844. Demonstration of riders with banners - one decorated with feathers reads: We have ruled and will again!'. In the background a model ship explodes. ...a procession of the Native American Party...six or eight men attired fantastically as Indian warriors, all mounted. Then came their banners and some flags, which were somewhat remarkable...The procession was orderly and decorous in their march; but when the procession had reached Second-street, near avenue A, and the gunner was in the act of firing a salute from the Miniature Ship, carried among the banners, &c., the powder-magazine exploded, carried away a large piece out of the side of the vessel, and shattered several windows in the vicinity. We regret to learn that two or three boys were severely hurt by the catastrophe'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol V

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Mrs Flora Drummond, arrested in Hyde Park, London, 1914, (1935) Featured Print

Mrs Flora Drummond, arrested in Hyde Park, London, 1914, (1935)

Mrs Flora Drummond, arrested in Hyde Park, London, 1914, (1935). General Flora Drummond joined the suffragette campaign to obtain the vote for women, shortly after the first militant act - the ejection of Christabel Pankhurst and Annie Kenney from the Free Trade Hall in Manchester, (1905). She moved to London as a paid organiser, and was imprisoned at least four times, once serving three weeks for chaining herself to the railings of 10 Downing Street. A print from King Emperor's Jubilee, 1910-1935, by FGH Salusbury, Daily Express Publications, London, 1935. (Colorised black and white print)

© The Print Collector

Route of the protest march to free the Tolpuddle Martyrs, (1834), 1934 Featured Print

Route of the protest march to free the Tolpuddle Martyrs, (1834), 1934

The route that the protest march to free the Tolpuddle Martyrs took. A vast demonstration took place on 21st April 1834 with up to 100, 000 people taking part. The Tolpuddle Martyrs were a group of 19th century agricultural labourers from Dorset who were convicted of swearing a secret oath as members of the Friendly Society of Agricultural Labourers. The rules of the society show it was clearly structured as a friendly society and operated as a trade-specific benefit society. At the time, friendly societies had strong elements of what would now be considered trade unions. Before 1824/25 the Combination Acts had outlawed combining or organising to gain better working conditions. The Tolpuddle Martyrs were subsequently sentenced to transportation to Australia. Their convictions caused public outcry and 800, 000 signatures were collected for their release. The march organised by thier supporters was one of the first successful political marches in the UK, and all, except James Hammett (who had a previous criminal record for theft) were released in 1836. From The Book of The Martyrs of Tolpuddle: 1834-1934, published by The Trades Union Congress General Council, 1934

© The Print Collector