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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Protest Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 89 pictures in our Protest collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Scottish marchers, Means Test protests, Hyde Park, London, 1932, (1933). Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Scottish marchers, Means Test protests, Hyde Park, London, 1932, (1933). Creator: Unknown

Scottish marchers, Means Test protests, Hyde Park, London, 1932, (1933). The Scottish demonstrators make their entry. Most of the marchers made their way peaceably to their homes'. One banner reads: Edinburgh District Contingent, Means Test Means Mass Murder - Smash It'. The National Hunger March of September to October 1932 was the largest of a series of hunger marches in Britain. The unemployment rate having reached 2,750,000, the 1932 National Unemployed Workers Movement organised Great National Hunger March against the Means Test, marching from the South Wales Valleys, Scotland and the North of England to Hyde Park in London. From "The Pageant of the Century". [Odhams Press Ltd, 1933]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Route of the protest march to free the Tolpuddle Martyrs, (1834), 1934 Featured Print

Route of the protest march to free the Tolpuddle Martyrs, (1834), 1934

The route that the protest march to free the Tolpuddle Martyrs took. A vast demonstration took place on 21st April 1834 with up to 100, 000 people taking part. The Tolpuddle Martyrs were a group of 19th century agricultural labourers from Dorset who were convicted of swearing a secret oath as members of the Friendly Society of Agricultural Labourers. The rules of the society show it was clearly structured as a friendly society and operated as a trade-specific benefit society. At the time, friendly societies had strong elements of what would now be considered trade unions. Before 1824/25 the Combination Acts had outlawed combining or organising to gain better working conditions. The Tolpuddle Martyrs were subsequently sentenced to transportation to Australia. Their convictions caused public outcry and 800, 000 signatures were collected for their release. The march organised by thier supporters was one of the first successful political marches in the UK, and all, except James Hammett (who had a previous criminal record for theft) were released in 1836. From The Book of The Martyrs of Tolpuddle: 1834-1934, published by The Trades Union Congress General Council, 1934

© The Print Collector

Mob firing cannon before the courthouse where Alexander McLeod was imprisoned, 1840 (c1880) Featured Print

Mob firing cannon before the courthouse where Alexander McLeod was imprisoned, 1840 (c1880)

Mob firing cannon before the courthouse where Alexander McLeod was imprisoned, 1840 (c1880). Alexander McLeod was a former deputy sheriff of Niagara district who was arrested in Buffalo and charged with the murder of Amos Durfee, an American killed during the Caroline Affair, an incident in the 1837 rebellion against British rule in Canada. He was imprisoned for 11 months before a trial acquitted him. The Caroline Affair temporarily placed a strain on relations between the United States and Britain. A print from Cassell's History of the United States, by Edmund Ollier, Volume III, Cassell Petter and Galpin, London, c1880

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images