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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Mughal Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 250 pictures in our Mughal collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Indian marble inlay, (1898). Creator: Unknown

Indian marble inlay, (1898). 'Figs 1 to 9: Marble marquetry from the mausoleums of the Shah Jehan and the Begum Mumtaz-i-Mahal...It is to the [17th century] that the marble-marquetries from the Mogul tombs at Agra belong...These artistically furnished mausoleums were built with white marble, whilst all prominent architectural parts of the structure were ornamented with manifold colored stones, such as jasper, heliotrope, chalcedony, agate etc. Every curved line, every closed bud and opening flower we find represented with a sweet regard to the beauties of nature and besides this all is in thorough harmony with those venerable mosaic technics [techniques]'. The Mughal emperor Shah Jahan and his wife Mumtaz Mahal are buried in the Taj Mahal at Agra, India, which Shah Jahan commissioned in 1632. Plate 16a from "The Historic Styles of Ornament" translated from the German of H. Dolmetsch. [B.T. Batford, London, 1898]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Featured Print

Stenciled Scenes of Lion and Gazelle (verso), c. 1710. Creator: Unknown

A Princess and Demons before a Nobleman: A Leaf from a Poetical Romance Relating to Shah Alam I (recto); Stenciled Scenes of Lion and Gazelle (verso), c. 1710. The source story of this painting remains enigmatic to scholars, but it includes a range of depictions of the "other"--from the foreign to the demonic. A prince kneeling in front of his horse addresses a lady; the moon in front of her face may identify her as Mahliqa ("moonlike" in Arabic), the Chinese princess identified by inscription on the adjacent page. A group of men whose eyes hang vertically stand behind her. Horned figures with grass skirts lie slain behind them, presumably killed by the kneeling prince conspicuously holding a bow. The city in the background, at the top of the painting, is populated solely by women, and its eight surrounding walls are interspersed with slain composite creatures wearing leaf skirts, which may identify them as bands of forest-dwellers, or tribal groups.

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Featured Print

Oval portrait of a woman in a Chaghtai hat, c. 1740-50. Creator: Unknown

Oval portrait of a woman in a Chaghtai hat, c. 1740-50. The tall, flat-topped hat is an element of the native dress of the Mughals from eastern Uzbekistan. Of mixed Turkic and Mongol ethnicities, they spoke a Turkic language known as Chaghatai. Chaghatai refers to the name of the son of the Mongol Chingiz (Genghis) Khan, who ruled this area of Central Asia from 1246 to 1282. This woman's hat has been studded with jewels and strings of pearls. The portrait jewel format that was once reserved for the emperor has now been expanded to include ladies of the court. The woman holds a jade wine cup and wears a draped upper garment with a woven or embroidered border similar to the fragment on display at the left.

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images