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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Dorset Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 196 pictures in our Dorset collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Posters warning those guilty of illegal oaths were liable to deportation, (1834), 1934 Featured Print

Posters warning those guilty of illegal oaths were liable to deportation, (1834), 1934

Posters warning that people found guilty of uttering illegal oaths were liable to deportation, 1834. On 24th February 1834 local landowners in Dorset put up posters warning that people found guilty of uttering illegal oaths were liable to deportation. The Tolpuddle Martyrs were a group of 19th century agricultural labourers from Dorset who were convicted of swearing a secret oath as members of the Friendly Society of Agricultural Labourers. The rules of the society show it was clearly structured as a friendly society and operated as a trade-specific benefit society. But at the time, friendly societies had strong elements of what would now be considered trade unions. Before 1824/25 the Combination Acts had outlawed combining or organising to gain better working conditions. The Tolpuddle Martyrs were subsequently sentenced to transportation to Australia. Their convictions caused public outcry and 800, 000 signatures were collected for their release. The march organised by thier supporters was one of the first successful political marches in the UK, and all, except James Hammett (who had a previous criminal record for theft) were released in 1836. From The Book of The Martyrs of Tolpuddle: 1834-1934, published by The Trades Union Congress General Council, 1934

© The Print Collector

Effigy of an Abbot, c. 1225. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Effigy of an Abbot, c. 1225. Creator: Unknown

Effigy of an Abbot, c. 1225. This funerary effigy represents one of the abbots of Cerne Abbey in Dorset, in southern England. His identity is unknown. Portrayed with tonsured (shaved) head and tightly curled beard, the abbot clasps a book in his left hand and traces of his crozier (staff) may be seen in his right hand---symbols of his office and pastoral authority. The figure is carved from "Purbeck marble," a limestone unique to the Purbeck Hills of Dorset. Very little remains of Cerne Abbey today, but it is known to have existed as early as the 9th century. The abbey was dissolved in 1539 by King Henry VIII during the English Reformation, at which time its buildings were razed to the ground. This is the only work of art that survives from the abbey and, though buffeted by time and history, retains much of its fine sculptural character. The sculpture has the additional distinction of being the only monument of its type in an American museum

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Edward Sackville, Fourth Earl of Dorset, c1630s, (early-mid 19th century). Creator Featured Print

Edward Sackville, Fourth Earl of Dorset, c1630s, (early-mid 19th century). Creator

Edward Sackville, Fourth Earl of Dorset, c1630s, (early-mid 19th century). Portrait of Edward Sackville, 4th Earl of Dorset (1591-1652), English soldier and statesman. In 1613, Sackville fought a duel for the hand of Venetia Stanley. He was run through the body and lost a finger but managed to kill his opponent. Sackville survived, though gravely wounded, but Venetia Stanley married someone else. From the original of Vandyke, in the collection of His Grace The Late Duke of Dorset'. [The London Printing and Publishing Company, London]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images