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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Chemical Industry Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 38 pictures in our Chemical Industry collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Distillation of Oil of Vitriol (sulphuric acid or H2S04), 1651 Featured Print

Distillation of Oil of Vitriol (sulphuric acid or H2S04), 1651

Distillation of Oil of Vitriol (sulphuric acid or H2S04), 1651. An iron retort with cover, detail at C, D, is placed in a furnace and connected to a receiver at A. At B the operator is removing the lid of a pot with tongs and inserting ingredients with a ladle. This process entailed prolonged heating. At E is a pot placed directly on the fire rather than in a furnace. From A Description of New Philosophical Furnaces by Johann Rudolph Glauber. First English edition, translated by John French (1616?-1657). (London, 1651)

© Oxford Science Archive / Heritage-Images

Production of saltpetre (nitre, potassium nitrate, or KN03), 1683 Featured Print

Production of saltpetre (nitre, potassium nitrate, or KN03), 1683

Production of saltpetre (nitre, potassium nitrate, or KN03), 1683. Nitre beds, heaps of manure mixed with chalky earth. These were watered with urine and manure water. Calcium nitrate crystallised on the surface and was scraped off and taken to shed for processing. Saltpetre is the principal ingredient in gunpowder, and is still used in the preservation of some foods. In medicine it was used internally as a diuretic, but now is only used externally for a number of conditions, such as asthma. From a 1683 English edition of Beschreibung allerfurnemisten mineralischen Ertzt by Lazarus Ercker. (Prague, 1574)

© Oxford Science Archive / Heritage-Images

Nitroglycerin processing plant, explosives factory, Val Bormida, near Cengio, Italy, 1888 Featured Print

Nitroglycerin processing plant, explosives factory, Val Bormida, near Cengio, Italy, 1888

Nitroglycerin processing plant, explosives factory, Val Bormida, near Cengio, north-west Italy, 1888. Nitroglycerin was mixed with Kieselghur (a diatomaceous earth) to produce Dynamite. Patented by Alfred Nobel (1833-1896) in 1867, Dynamite is more a more stable high explosive than gunpowder and nitroclycernin and quickly gained popularity for blasting in mining, tunnelling and quarrying. Because of the instablility of the materials used in its production, earth embankments separate each building and surround the whole complex. The roofs of the buildings were not fixed so that in the event of an explosion the blast would travel vertically rather than horizontally. From La Nature, Paris, 1888

© Ann Ronan Picture Library / Heritage-Images