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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

18th Dynasty Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 246 pictures in our 18th Dynasty collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Colossal statue of Thoth, Hermopolis Magna, Egypt, c1370 BC. Artist: Werner Forman Featured Print

Colossal statue of Thoth, Hermopolis Magna, Egypt, c1370 BC. Artist: Werner Forman

Colossal statue of Thoth, Hermopolis Magna, Egypt, c1370 BC. One of the colossal statues of the god Thoth, in his baboon aspect, at Hermopolis Magna. Hermopolis was the capital of the 15th Upper Egyptian nome and was dedicated to the cult of Thoth. During Ptolemaic times the Greek god Hermes took the attributes of Thoth, hence the name Hermopolis (city of Hermes). The statue dates from the reign of the Pharaoh Amenhotep III

© Werner Forman Archive / Heritage-Images

Sandstone head of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, Ancient Egyptian, 18th dynasty, c1350 BC Featured Print

Sandstone head of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, Ancient Egyptian, 18th dynasty, c1350 BC

Sandstone head of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, Ancient Egyptian, 18th dynasty, c1350 BC. From the Aten Temple, Karnak. The pharaoh is depicted wearing the blue crown or khepresh. After he ascended to the throne in c1350 BC Akhenaten (Amenhotep IV) set about transforming the religion of Ancient Egypt, replacing the existing polytheism with a monotheistic cult of worshipping Aten, the god of the disc of the Sun. In addition, he decreed that Egypt's capital was to be moved from Thebes to a new site 180 miles to the north, to be named Akhetaten (modern El-Amarna). These massive upheavals generated growing opposition to Akhenaten, particularly amongst the priesthood. In c1334 BC Akhenaten died and Egypt turned its back on his reforms. The city of Akhetaten was abandoned and Egyptians returned to worshipping their traditional gods From the Egyptian Museum, Berlin

© Werner Forman Archive/ Egyptian Museum, Berlin/Heritage-Images

Sandstone bust of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, Ancient Egyptian, 18th dynasty, c1350 BC Featured Print

Sandstone bust of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, Ancient Egyptian, 18th dynasty, c1350 BC

Sandstone bust of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, Ancient Egyptian, 18th dynasty, c1350 BC. From the Aten Temple, Karnak. The pharaoh is depicted wearing the blue crown or khepresh. After he ascended to the throne in c1350 BC Akhenaten (Amenhotep IV) set about transforming the religion of Ancient Egypt, replacing the existing polytheism with a monotheistic cult of worshipping Aten, the god of the disc of the Sun. In addition, he decreed that Egypt's capital was to be moved from Thebes to a new site 180 miles to the north, to be named Akhetaten (modern El-Amarna). These massive upheavals generated growing opposition to Akhenaten, particularly amongst the priesthood. In c1334 BC Akhenaten died and Egypt turned its back on his reforms. The city of Akhetaten was abandoned and Egyptians returned to worshipping their traditional gods From the Louvre Museum, Paris

© Werner Forman Archive/ Louvre Museum, Paris/Heritage-Images