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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Workbench Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 79 pictures in our Workbench collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Schoolroom, (1881). Creator: Unknown Featured Print

The Schoolroom, (1881). Creator: Unknown

The Schoolroom, (1881). Boys and their teacher in a great hall with wooden beams. Names are carved into the walls. The school, at Westminster in London, dates from at least the early fourteenth century. From Old and New London: A Narrative of Its History, Its People, and Its Places. Westminster and the Western Suburbs, by Edward Walford, Vol. III. [Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., London, Paris & New York, 1881]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

One of the cigar manufacturing departments at Salmon and Gluckstein, Ltd, London, c1870s (1903) Featured Print

One of the cigar manufacturing departments at Salmon and Gluckstein, Ltd, London, c1870s (1903)

One of the cigar manufacturing departments at Salmon and Gluckstein, Ltd, London, c1870s (1903). Salmon & Gluckstein was a British tobacco company, founded in London in 1873 by Samuel Gluckstein (1821-1873) and Barnett Salmon. The business expanded rapidly before being bought by Imperial Tobacco in 1902. From Living London, Vol. II, by George R. Sims. [Cassell and Company, Limited, London, Paris, New York & Melbourne, 1903]

© The Print Collector

Pierre and Marie Curie in their laboratory, 1898 (1951) Featured Print

Pierre and Marie Curie in their laboratory, 1898 (1951)

Pierre and Marie Curie in their laboratory. 1898, (1951). Polish-born Marie Curie and her husband Pierre continued the work on radioactivity started by Henri Becquerel. In 1898, they discovered two new elements, polonium and radium. Marie did most of the work of producing these elements, and to this day her notebooks are still too radioactive to use. She went on to become the first woman to be awarded a doctorate in France, and continued her work after Pierre's death in 1906. In 1903 they shared the Nobel Prize for Physics with Becquerel. A print from 100 Years in Pictures, A panorama of History in the Making, text by DC Somervell, Odhams press Limited, London, 1951

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images