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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Wild Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 99 pictures in our Wild collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


'Camp Under The Wild Range', 20 December 1911, (1913). Artist: Robert Falcon Scott Featured Print

'Camp Under The Wild Range', 20 December 1911, (1913). Artist: Robert Falcon Scott

'Camp Under The Wild Range', 20 December 1911, (1913). Three pyramid tents camped near Beardmore Glacier and Mount Wild: two figures can be seen sketching on the sledge. Apsley Cherry-Garrard is drawing the view towards Mount Buckley and Edward Wilson is making detailed sketches and notes of the geological features. The final expedition of British Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) left London on 1 June 1910 bound for the South Pole. The Terra Nova Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-1913), included a geologist, a zoologist, a surgeon, a photographer, an engineer, a ski expert, a meteorologist and a physicist among others. Scott wished to continue the scientific work that he had begun when leading the Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04. He also wanted to be the first to reach the geographic South Pole. Scott, accompanied by Dr Edward Wilson, Captain Lawrence Oates, Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Petty Officer Edgar Evans, reached the Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that the Norwegian expedition under Amundsen had beaten them to their objective by a month. Delayed by blizzards, and running out of supplies, Scott and the remainder of his team died at the end of March. Their bodies and diaries were found eight months later. From Scott's Last Expedition, Volume I. [Smith, Elder & Co., London, 1913]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

'The Christmas Camp on the Plateau', December 1908, (1909). Artist: Ernest Shackleton Featured Print

'The Christmas Camp on the Plateau', December 1908, (1909). Artist: Ernest Shackleton

'The Christmas Camp on the Plateau. The figures from left to right are [Jameson] Adams, [Eric] Marshall and [Frank] Wild. The frost can be seen on the men's faces', December 1908, (1909). Expedition members stand in front of a pyramidal tent on a flat snow field. A loaded sledge stands next to the tent, a union jack flies from one flag pole. A theodolite stands on a tripod to one side, ice-axes stand in the snow. Anglo-Irish explorer Ernest Shackleton (1874-1922) made three expeditions to the Antarctic. During the second expedition, 1907-1909, he and three companions established a new record, Farthest South latitude at 88°S, only 97 geographical miles (112 statute miles, or 180 km) from the South Pole, the largest advance to the pole in exploration history. Members of his team also climbed Mount Erebus, the most active volcano in the Antarctic. Shackleton was knighted by King Edward VII for these achievements. He died during his third and last 'oceanographic and sub-antarctic' expedition, aged 47. Illustration from The Heart of the Antarctic, Vol. I, by E. H. Shackleton, C.V.O. [William Heinemann, London, 1909]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

'Preparing A Sledge During the Winter', 1908, (1909). Artist: Unknown Featured Print

'Preparing A Sledge During the Winter', 1908, (1909). Artist: Unknown

'Preparing A Sledge During the Winter', 1908, (1909). Inside the Cape Royds Hut: Shackleton (left background), Bertram Armytage Armytage (standing background), Jameson Adams (smoking curved pipe), Frank Wild (working on the sledge) and Joyce (extreme right, foreground). A poster advertising ladies' corsets hangs on the wall. Anglo-Irish explorer Ernest Shackleton (1874-1922) made three expeditions to the Antarctic. During the second expedition, 1907-1909, he and three companions established a new record, Farthest South latitude at 88°S, only 97 geographical miles (112 statute miles, or 180 km) from the South Pole, the largest advance to the pole in exploration history. Members of his team also climbed Mount Erebus, the most active volcano in the Antarctic. Shackleton was knighted by King Edward VII for these achievements. He died during his third and last 'oceanographic and sub-antarctic' expedition, aged 47. Illustration from The Heart of the Antarctic, Vol. I, by E. H. Shackleton, C.V.O. [William Heinemann, London, 1909]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images