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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Tired Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 75 pictures in our Tired collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


My Second Sermon, 1864, (1947). Creator: John Everett Millais Featured Print

My Second Sermon, 1864, (1947). Creator: John Everett Millais

My Second Sermon, 1864, (1947). The Artist's Daughter in Winchelsea Church': portrait of Millais daughter Effie, aged about five, having fallen asleep during the service. The location was probably All Saints Church at Kingston-on-Thames, Surrey. A companion piece, painted a year or so earlier, shows her sitting upright and looking somewhat daunted during her first sermon. Painting in the Guildhall Art Gallery, London. From "English Hymns and Hymn Writers", by Adam Fox. [Collins, London, 1947]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

The Tender Grace of a Day that is Dead, late 19th century, (c1930). Creator: Walter Langley Featured Print

The Tender Grace of a Day that is Dead, late 19th century, (c1930). Creator: Walter Langley

The Tender Grace of a Day that is Dead, late 19th century, (c1930). A woman looks wistfully out of the window as her son whittles a piece of wood, possibly for the toy boat in the window-seat. On her lap is fabric she has been mending, with thread and a sewing box on the table next to her. Painting, also known as The tender grace of a day that is dead will never come back to me, in the Gallery Oldham, Greater Manchester. From "Modern Masterpieces of British Art". [The Amalgamated Press Ltd., London, c1930]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

At The South Pole, (Bowers pulls the string), January 1912, (1913). Artist: Henry Bowers Featured Print

At The South Pole, (Bowers pulls the string), January 1912, (1913). Artist: Henry Bowers

At The South Pole, (Bowers pulls the string), January 1912, (1913). Left to right: Captain Lawrence Oates, Captain Robert Falcon Scott, Petty Officer Edgar Evans, seated left to right: Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Dr Edward Wilson in front of flags including the Norwegian flag planted by Roald Amundsen a month earlier. Oates (1880-1912), Evans (1876-1912), Bowers (1883-1912), (1872-1912) and expedition leader Captain Robert F Scott (1868-1912) all died on the way back from the South Pole. The final expedition of British Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) left London on 1 June 1910 bound for the South Pole. The Terra Nova Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-1913), included a geologist, a zoologist, a surgeon, a photographer, an engineer, a ski expert, a meteorologist and a physicist among others. Scott wished to continue the scientific work that he had begun when leading the Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04. He also wanted to be the first to reach the geographic South Pole. Scott, accompanied by Dr Edward Wilson, Captain Lawrence Oates, Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Petty Officer Edgar Evans, reached the Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that the Norwegian expedition under Amundsen had beaten them to their objective by a month. Delayed by blizzards, and running out of supplies, Scott and the remainder of his team died at the end of March. Their bodies and diaries were found eight months later. From Scott's Last Expedition, Volume I. [Smith, Elder & Co., London, 1913]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images