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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Textiles Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 638 pictures in our Textiles collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Italian Renaissance embroidery and carpet-weaving, (1898). Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Italian Renaissance embroidery and carpet-weaving, (1898). Creator: Unknown

Italian Renaissance embroidery and carpet-weaving, (1898). Fig 1: Embroidery on an ecclesiastical mantle in S. Croce at Florence'. Fig 2: Embroidered little velvet cover in the Museum vaterlandischer Altertumer at Stuttgart. Fig 3: Embroidered velvet-border from a chasuble, ibid. Fig 4: Silk-embroidery in applique work from a chasuble, ibid. Fig 5: Relief-embroidery in gold upon silk from a chasuble, ibid. Figs 6 and 7: Silk-embroideries in applique work upon damask-ground. Fig 8: Carpet-border from a Venetian picture at Verona. Fig 9: Carpet-border from a picture by Paolo Giolfino in the museum, ibid. Fig 10: Carpet-border from a picture by Moroni in the Pinacothec at Munich. Embroidery, either applique or flat work, the latter frequently relief-like, took its motives [motifs] from the same sources as the hitherto treated branches of art, and it also united with the mere ornament proper images, especially in form of medallions. Carpet-weaving, inasmuch as it is not fancy-weaving, but applying geometric or vegetable designs, follows in the main features Byzantine and Oriental examples'. Plate 51 from "The Historic Styles of Ornament" translated from the German of H. Dolmetsch. [B.T. Batford, London, 1898]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Lucretia and her handmaids spinning, 1537-45. Creator: Antonio Fantuzzi Featured Print

Lucretia and her handmaids spinning, 1537-45. Creator: Antonio Fantuzzi

Lucretia and her handmaids spinning, 1537-45. [...Lucretia, before whose bed were baskets full of soft wool. By a dim light the handmaids were spinning their allotted stints of yarn. Amongst them the lady spoke on accents soft: "Haste ye now, haste, my girls! The cloak our hands have wrought must to your master be instantly dispatched."]

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Interior of a Power-Loom factory, 1844. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Interior of a Power-Loom factory, 1844. Creator: Unknown

Interior of a Power-Loom factory, 1844. We are persuaded that the annexed engraving will be interesting to our readers, in connection with the great question of "The Factory Bill," which has just been disposed of by the Legislature.
The power-loom is now generally used in the cotton manufacture, for the weaving of plain cloth, and for the various kinds of twilled and figured goods; and Dr. Cooke Taylor considers that manual labour, at least for the coarser kinds of goods, must rapidly fall into disuse. In one respect, the power-loom has a very obvious advantage over the hand-loom...the lathe is easily adjusted to give a certain steady blow...power-loom cloth is always of a more equable and regular texture than that woven by hand'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol I

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images