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Sinking Gallery

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Sender of the S. O. S. Signal for Help, (April 20), 1912. Creator: Unknown Featured Image

Sender of the S. O. S. Signal for Help, (April 20), 1912. Creator: Unknown

Sender of the "S. O. S." Signal for Help, (April 20), 1912. John George Phillips (nicknamed Jack, 1887-1912) was the ship's senior wireless operator who tried to save the Titanic and all those on board by transmitting pleas for help until the ship lost power and sank. He died in the tragedy and his body was never recovered. The White Star Line ship RMS Titanic struck an iceberg in thick fog off Newfoundland on 14 April 1912. She was the largest and most luxurious ocean liner of her time, and thought to be unsinkable. In the collision, five of her watertight compartments were compromised and she sank. Out of the 2228 people on board, only 705 survived. A major cause of the loss of life was the insufficient number of lifeboats she carried. Page 8, from "Titanic In Memoriam Number", a special supplement in "The Daily Graphic" newspaper issued following the sinking of the Titanic on 15 April 1912, published on 20 April 1912

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

The John O'Gaunt 'settling down', 1844. Creator: Unknown Featured Image

The John O'Gaunt "settling down", 1844. Creator: Unknown

The John O'Gaunt "settling down", 1844. Explosion of a ship at Brighton by Captain Warner who...put to the test his alleged power of destroying ships at sea, completely and instantaneously...an immense cloud, seemingly of smoke of an unusually white complexion, but really of spray, was seen to ascend from the vessel [the John of Gaunt]...she seemed to be enveloped in a cloud of smoke...the main and mizen masts were seen to fall over the vessel into the sea. A few seconds more, and a rumbling sort of noise, which it is difficult to describe, was heard to proceed from the ship, and ere yet the sound had died on the ear the vessel was a complete wreck. She went almost instantaneously to pieces, no trace of her being visible but the top of her foremast'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol V

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Sectional diagram of the Titanic, and iceberg, April 20, 1912. Creator: Unknown Featured Image

Sectional diagram of the Titanic, and iceberg, April 20, 1912. Creator: Unknown

Sectional diagram of the Titanic, and iceberg, April 20, 1912. The Greatest of All Ships and the Greatest of All Shipping Disasters. The Titanic and the Perils of the Atlantic': sectional diagram of the Titanic, showing the state rooms, cabins, cargo holds and engine rooms, and illustration of an iceberg. The White Star Line ship RMS Titanic struck an iceberg in thick fog off Newfoundland on 14 April 1912. She was the largest and most luxurious ocean liner of her time, and thought to be unsinkable. In the collision, five of her watertight compartments were compromised and she sank. Out of the 2228 people on board, only 705 survived. A major cause of the loss of life was the insufficient number of lifeboats she carried. Page 11, from "Titanic In Memoriam Number", a special supplement in "The Daily Graphic" newspaper issued following the sinking of the Titanic on 15 April 1912, published on 20 April 1912

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images


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