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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Searching Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 42 pictures in our Searching collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Cromwell at the Blue Boar, Holborn, London, 1640, (c1883), (c1902). Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Cromwell at the Blue Boar, Holborn, London, 1640, (c1883), (c1902). Creator: Unknown

Cromwell at the Blue Boar, Holborn, London, 1640, (c1883), (c1902). After a painting in the Dudley Museums Service collection. Victorian depiction of a scene at the Blue Boar inn, in which Oliver Cromwell supposedly intercepted a letter from King Charles I. Soldiers search a messenger's bags and find the letter detailing plans for the King to join forces with the Scots in order to thwart Cromwell's rebellion. From The Nation's Pictures. A selection from the finest modern paintings in the public picture galleries of Great Britain, reproduced in colour. [Cassell and Company Ltd, London, c1902]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

The Royal Oak, the Penderell Family have no idea where Charles is!!!, 1850. Artist: John Leech Featured Print

The Royal Oak, the Penderell Family have no idea where Charles is!!!, 1850. Artist: John Leech

The Royal Oak, the Penderell Family have no idea where Charles is!!!, 1850. A satirical illustration of King Charles II escaping into exile. King Charles II (1630?1685) in disguise riding before Mrs Lane by which he made his escape. Lord Wilmot in the distance. After the execution of his father, Charles I, Charles II claimed the throne and invaded England in 1651. He was defeated by the Parliamentarian army at the Battle of Worcester and was forced to hide in a hollow oak tree near Boscobel House in Shropshire to elude the Parliamentarian forces trying to capture him. Charles escaped into exile in disguise but returned when the monarchy was restored after the death of Oliver Cromwell and the end of the Protectorate. From The Comic History of England by Gilbert Abbott A. Beckett, illustrated by John Leech [Bradbury, Agnew & Co., London, 1850.]

© The Print Collector

Chistian Davies (or Old Mother Ross'), c1706 (1904) Featured Print

Chistian Davies (or Old Mother Ross'), c1706 (1904)

Chistian Davies (or Old Mother Ross'), c1706 (1904). Born Christian Cavanagh in Dublin, Christian Kit Davies (1667-1739) served in disguise in the British Army from 1693 to 1697 and again from 1701 until 1706, in an attempt to find her husband, who was also serving in the army, possibly after being pressed into service. She finally located him in 1704 after the Battle of Blenheim, but after discovering him with another woman, decided to remain in the army. In 1706 Davies was wounded at the Battle of Ramillies, suffering a fractured skull, and her identity as a woman was discovered by the surgeon treating her wounds. After this she was discharged from her regiment, the Scots Greys, but the regimental commander agreed that she should continue to be paid while in the care of the army, and as part of her discharge, the regiment's officers paid for a new wardrobe for her. A print from The Girl's Own Annual, 1 October 1904

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images