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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Scientific Instrument Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 72 pictures in our Scientific Instrument collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


E. W. Nelson with the Nansen-Petersen Insulated Water-Bottle, c1911, (1913). Artist Featured Print

E. W. Nelson with the Nansen-Petersen Insulated Water-Bottle, c1911, (1913). Artist

E. W. Nelson with the Nansen-Petersen Insulated Water-Bottle, c1911, (1913). Expedition biologist Edward W Nelson (1883-1923) carrying out research. A Nansen bottle is a device for obtaining samples of seawater at a specific depth. The final expedition of British Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) left London on 1 June 1910 bound for the South Pole. The Terra Nova Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-1913), included a geologist, a zoologist, a surgeon, a photographer, an engineer, a ski expert, a meteorologist and a physicist among others. Scott wished to continue the scientific work that he had begun when leading the Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04. He also wanted to be the first to reach the geographic South Pole. Scott, accompanied by Dr Edward Wilson, Captain Lawrence Oates, Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Petty Officer Edgar Evans, reached the Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that the Norwegian expedition under Amundsen had beaten them to their objective by a month. Delayed by blizzards, and running out of supplies, Scott and the remainder of his team died at the end of March. Their bodies and diaries were found eight months later. From Scott's Last Expedition, Volume II. [Smith, Elder & Co., London, 1913]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

William Herschels reflecting telescope of 40 ft (12 m) focal length, 1789 (1807) Featured Print

William Herschels reflecting telescope of 40 ft (12 m) focal length, 1789 (1807)

William Herschel's reflecting telescope of 40 ft (12 m) focal length, 1789 (1807). Built by the German-born English astronomer, William Herschel (1738-1822), in the grounds of his home in Slough, Berkshire, this instrument was the largest in the world, with a 4 ft (1.2 m) mirror. Herschel made observations with this telescope, including the discovery of two new moons of Saturn on the first night he used it, but made more use of a smaller 18 inch/46 cm instrument. From The Edinburgh Encyclopaedia. (Edinburgh, 1807-1829)

© Oxford Science Archive / Heritage-Images

Torricellis demonstration of the effect of atmospheric pressure on a column of liquid, 1643 (1873) Featured Print

Torricellis demonstration of the effect of atmospheric pressure on a column of liquid, 1643 (1873)

Evangelista Torricelli's demonstration of the effect of atmospheric pressure on a column of liquid, 1643 (1873). Torricelli (1608-1647), Italian physicist and mathematician, showed that the height of a column of liquid is governed by atmospheric pressure and that the height of the column is directly proportional to the density of the liquid. Water will rise to 9.75m (32 feet) but mercury, which is approximately 13.5 times denser, will only rise to .736m (29 ins). A metre (3 feet) tube is filled with mercury and the open end placed in a dish of mercury. The liquid will fall in the tube until the weight of the column is in equilibrium with atmospheric pressure. From The Atmosphere by Camille Flammarion. (London, 1873)

© Oxford Science Archive / Heritage-Images