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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Sack Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 85 pictures in our Sack collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


'Storming of Constantinople by Baldwin, Count of Flanders', (1204), 1890. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

'Storming of Constantinople by Baldwin, Count of Flanders', (1204), 1890. Creator: Unknown

'Storming of Constantinople by Baldwin, Count of Flanders', (1204), 1890. Following the Sack of Constantinople in April 1204, during the Fourth Crusade, Crusader armies captured, looted, and destroyed the Byzantine city and Baldwin of Flanders was crowned Emperor Baldwin I of Constantinople. From "Cassell's Illustrated Universal History, Vol. III - The Middle Ages", by Edmund Ollier. [Cassell and Company, Limited, London, Paris and Melbourne, 1890. ]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

The Roman Forum Featured Print

The Roman Forum

The Roman Forum. Relief from the Arch of Titus showing the triumphal procession after the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70. Spoils from the Second temple in Jerusalem, including the seven-branched candelabra, the silver trumpets and the Table of the Shewbread are carried. Country of Origin: Italy. Culture: Roman. Credit Line: Werner Forman Archive/ . Location: 01.

© Werner Forman Archive / Heritage-Images

Moscow on fire, 15th September 1812 (1882-1884).Artist: A Etienne Featured Print

Moscow on fire, 15th September 1812 (1882-1884).Artist: A Etienne

Moscow on fire, 15th September 1812 (1882-1884). After the indecisive but bloody Battle of Borodino, the Russians abandoned Moscow to Napoleon and the French invaders, setting fire to stores of food before they left. The French occupied and looted the city which, consisting mainly of wooden buildings, was largely destroyed by fire. Hoping for a Russian surrender, Napoleon waited in Moscow for five weeks, but with no capitulation forthcoming, short of food and menaced by Russian manouevres outside the city, he began in mid-October what would become an epic retreat. When the Grande Armee finally crossed the Niemen out of Russian territory on 7th December only 20, 000 men out of the original force of over 600, 000 remained. A print from La France et les Francais a Travers les Siecles, Volume IV, F Roy editor, A Challamel, Saint-Antoine, 1882-1884.

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images