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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Physiology Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 43 pictures in our Physiology collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Claude Bernard, French physiologist, 1876 Featured Print

Claude Bernard, French physiologist, 1876

Claude Bernard, French physiologist, 1876. Bernard (1813-1878) investigated the liver, discovering glycogen, and determined that most of the process of digestion occurs in the small intestine, rather that the stomach. He showed that haemoglobin carries oxygen in red blood cells, and demonstated how carbon monoxide poisoning disrupted this process. When Bernard died in 1878, the French government organised his funeral, making him the first French scientist to be honoured in this way. A photograph from Album de Photographies, Dans L'Intimite de Personnages Illustres, 1845-1890, Editions MD, 22 Rue de L'Arcade, Paris 8, 1845-1890

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Claude Bernard, French physiologist, 19th century Featured Print

Claude Bernard, French physiologist, 19th century

Claude Bernard, French physiologist, 19th century. From the obverse of a commemorative medal. Bernard (1813-1878) investigated the liver, discovering glycogen, and determined that most of the process of digestion occurs in the small intestine, rather that the stomach. He showed that haemoglobin carries oxygen in red blood cells, and demonstated how carbon monoxide poisoning disrupted this process. When Bernard died in 1878, the French government organised his funeral, making him the first French scientist to be honoured in this way

© Oxford Science Archive / Heritage-Images

Luigi Galvanis experiments with electricity, 1791 Featured Print

Luigi Galvanis experiments with electricity, 1791

Luigi Galvani's experiments with electricity, 1791. An electrostatic machine, a Leyden jar and various experiments conducted by Italian physiologist Galvani (1737-1798) to investigate behaviour of muscles stimulated by electricity. Whilst investigating the effects of electrostatic stimuli applied to the muscles of frogs, Galvani discovered he could make a muscle twitch by touching the nerve with metal (a pair of scissors for example) without a source of electrostatic charge. He called this phenomenon animal electricity'. The term galvanise - to shock or excite into action, takes its name from him. From De Viribus Electricitatis by Luigi Galvani. (Bologna, 1791)

© Oxford Science Archive / Heritage-Images