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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Parade Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 253 pictures in our Parade collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

'The Royal Albert Hall, 1871: Opened by Queen Victoria, March 29', (1901). Creator: Unknown

'The Royal Albert Hall, 1871: Opened by Queen Victoria, March 29', (1901). Queen Victoria (1819-1901) opening the concert hall in South Kensington, London. The building was originally to have been called the Central Hall of Arts and Sciences, but was renamed by Victoria in memory of her husband, Prince Albert, who died at the age of 42, and who had been instrumental in redeveloping the area which became known as 'Albertopolis'. From "The Illustrated London News Record of the Glorious Reign of Queen Victoria 1837-1901: The Life and Accession of King Edward VII. and the Life of Queen Alexandra". [London, 1901]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Featured Print

'W.A.A.F. Band on Parade', c1943. Creator: Cecil Beaton

'W.A.A.F. Band on Parade', c1943. The Women's Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF), whose members were referred to as 'WAAFs', was the female auxiliary of the British Royal Air Force during World War II. Its members did not serve as aircrew, but although they did not participate in active combat, they were exposed to the same dangers as any on the home front working at military installations. Among their duties were: crewing of barrage balloons, catering, meteorology, radar, aircraft maintenance, transport, communications duties including wireless telephonic and telegraphic operation. At its peak strength, in 1943, the number of WAAFs (members of the force) exceeded 180,000, with over 2,000 women enlisting per week. From "Wings On Her Shoulders", by Katharine Bentley Beauman, Late Fight Officer W.A.A.F. [Hutchinson & Co Ltd, London, New York, Melbourne, c1943]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Featured Print

'The Ceremony at St. Paul's', London, 1897. Artist: E&S Woodbury

'The Ceremony at St. Paul's', London, 1897. 'The photograph was taken immediately after the conclusion of the Service, when Her Majesty (whose face is clearly seen) turned to receive the congratulations of the Prince of Wales and the Duke of Cambridge. The latter is in the act of addressing the Queen: the Prince is close behind him. The Princess of Wales and Princess Christian are the other occupants of the carriage; the latter holds her fan to screen her face from the sun. The Archbishop of Canterbury (Dr. Temple) stands directly above the Queen.' Queen Victoria (1819-1901) celebrated her Diamond Jubilee (60th anniversary of her reign - June 1837-June 1897). Her reign of 63 years and seven months was longer than that of any previous British monarch. Here her carriage is seen outside St Paul's Cathedral. From Sixty Years A Queen: The Story of Her Majesty's Reign, by Sir Herbert Maxwell. [Harmsworth Bros, Limited, London, c1897]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images