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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Occasion Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 51 pictures in our Occasion collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Arrival at Brandenburg House of the Watermen, etc with an Address to the Queen Featured Print

Arrival at Brandenburg House of the Watermen, etc with an Address to the Queen

Arrival at Brandenburg House of the Watermen, etc. with an Address to the Queen on the 3rd October 1820, pub. 1821 (coloured engraving). Queen Caroline (1768 - 1821) lived in Brandenberg House for two years prior to her death in 1821; this is one of many regattas which took place to show public support for her after her husband, George IV (1762 - 1830) refused to allow her to be crowned

© Historica Graphica Collection / Heritage-Images

The coronation of King Charles X of France, Reims, 20 May 1825 (1900) Featured Print

The coronation of King Charles X of France, Reims, 20 May 1825 (1900)

The coronation of King Charles X of France, Reims, 20 May 1825 (1900). The brother of Louis XVI and Louis XVIII, Charles (1757-1836) came to the throne in succession to the latter in 1824. His coronation, at the traditional site of Reims, was a grandiose affair comparable in scale (and cost) to that of George IV of England in 1821. In style his rule harked back to the pre-revolutionary Ancien Regime, making him unpopular with the liberal elements of French society. In 1830 he elected to abdicate rather than rule as a constitutional monarch

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

The Coronation Chair, with the Stone of Scone, Westminster Abbey, London, 1937 Featured Print

The Coronation Chair, with the Stone of Scone, Westminster Abbey, London, 1937

The Coronation Chair, with the Stone of Scone, Westminster Abbey, London, 1937. The seat in which all sovereigns of England (save Mary I and Mary II), have been crowned since Edward I. The Stone of Scone was traditonally used in the coronation ceremonies of Kings of Scotland until it was seized by Edward I and brought back to England. In 1996 the stone was returned to Scotland with the proviso that it would be transported to Westminster Abbey for future coronations. A coloured plate from the Illustrated London News: Coronation Record Number, (London, 1937)

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images