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St Albans, c1910
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St Albans, c1910
Shrewsbury Castle, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, 1894. Creator: Unknown Featured Image

Shrewsbury Castle, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, 1894. Creator: Unknown

Shrewsbury Castle, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, 1894. View of the castle with the Clement memorial obelisk, erected in 1873, to the memory of surgeon and politician William James Clement. The Norman castle was founded by Roger de Montgomery in c1070. Much of it was demolished during the rebuilding and strengthening of the castle by Edward I in c1300, when an outer bailey was also added. It was never used as a fortress after this date, and over the centuries was allowed to fall into disrepair. Elizabeth I gave the castle to the bailiffs and burgesses of Shrewsbury in 1586, and little was done to the building until the Civil War, when further alterations were made. It was captured by the Parliamentarians in 1645, and it was not until 1660, when Charles II was restored to the throne, that it was returned to the ownership of the crown. From Beautiful Britain; views of our stately homes. [The Werner Company of Chicago, 1894]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

The death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, (1944). Creator: Unknown Featured Image

The death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, (1944). Creator: Unknown

The death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, (1944). The Latin reads: Harold Rex Interfectus Est - King Harold is killed. English forces led by King Harold II fought the invading Normans under William I. It has been suggested that the arrow in the eye account of Harold's death was deliberately invented by the Normans as an attempt to legitimise William's siezure of the English crown, by portraying Harold as having been struck down by God as punishment for his breaking of his oath to William. Detail from the Bayeux Tapestry, the famous embroidery made a few years after the Norman invasion of England in 1066. From "Battlefields in Britain, by C. V. Wedgwood. [Collins, London, 1944]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

The cists in Southover Church, 1845. Creator: Richard Henry Nibbs Featured Image

The cists in Southover Church, 1845. Creator: Richard Henry Nibbs

The cists in Southover Church, 1845. 11th-century human remains found in the ruins of the ancient Priory of Lewes in Sussex, during the construction of a railway line....the workmen exposed a leaden Cist, or coffer, surrounded by a few square Caen stones. After clearing away the soil, the Cist was carefully removed, and, on being opened, was found to contain human bones, proved to be the remains of Gundreda, daughter of William the Conqueror, the name "GVNDRADA, " as it is spelt, being cut upon the lid....'. A second cist was found, ...and on the lid is inscribed WILLMs, an old but usual way of writing Gulielmus. This has been readily interpreted into the name of William of Warren; by this means establishing the fact that these Cists contain the remains of Gundreda, the founder of the Priory, and of her lord, the first Earl of Warren and Surrey'. From "Illustrated London News", 1845, Vol VII

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images


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