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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

New Kingdom Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 373 pictures in our New Kingdom collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Talatat: Men Hoeing the Earth, c. 1353-1347 BC. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Talatat: Men Hoeing the Earth, c. 1353-1347 BC. Creator: Unknown

Talatat: Men Hoeing the Earth, c. 1353-1347 BC. In the early part of his reign, Amenhotep IV built an enormous temple to the sun disk (Aten) at the east end of the temple of Karnak. To expedite construction, sandstone was quarried in small, regularly sized, easily manageable blocks called talatat. Unlike the huge monoliths typically used in temple construction, talatat could be carried and moved into position by one man. Not all of the temple was built of stone, however. In this block, workmen are shown bent in toil. They once formed part of a panoramic scene depicting the production of mud bricks. The men are involved in the initial stages of this process: hacking up the earth and gathering the raw clay. It is very likely that this talatat represents a distinct historical event, undoubtedly connected with Amenhotep IV's huge building enterprises at East Karnak

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Nome Gods Bearing Offerings, c. 1391-1353 BC. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Nome Gods Bearing Offerings, c. 1391-1353 BC. Creator: Unknown

Nome Gods Bearing Offerings, c. 1391-1353 BC. These blocks from a temple wall have preserved their original painted decoration to a remarkable degree. The four portly figures in the lower register bear emblems on their heads identifying them as nomes, or provinces, of ancient Egypt. Carrying trays heaped with offerings and leading sacrificial animals, they personify the bounty of the land. First (on the right) is the Oryx Nome, followed by the Dog Nome, the Falcon Nome, and the Double Scepter Nome. The face of each nome figure is a miniature portrait of Amenhotep III, and each recites a speech in the king's name. The first figure says, "King Nebmaatra [Amenhotep III] has come, bringing to you every good thing that is in this land, that you may give him all life, stability, dominion, and all health from you." The second, third, and fourth figures bring "all greens," "the produce of the Two Lands [Upper and Lower Egypt]," and "all offerings and provisions." The god to whom the nomes bring offerings stood in the fragmentary upper register, facing a standing figure of the king, Amenhotep III. The pair of legs on the right belonged to the god; the single foot on the left belonged to the king. The god held a scepter, forked at the bottom, embellished with coils of rope (for eternity), tadpoles (for hundreds of thousands), and notched palm ribs (for years), the whole signifying "an eternity of hundreds of thousands of years." These blocks may be from Amenhotep III's temple at Kom el-Ahmar, ancient Hebenu, in Middle Egypt, dedicated to the god Horus. Hebenu was the capital of the Oryx Nome, which leads the procession of nome gods. Amenhotep III's temple was later dismantled, and its blocks were reused in the foundations of another structure, which would account for the excellent preservation of the paint

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Sandstone head of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, Ancient Egyptian, 18th dynasty, c1350 BC Featured Print

Sandstone head of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, Ancient Egyptian, 18th dynasty, c1350 BC

Sandstone head of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, Ancient Egyptian, 18th dynasty, c1350 BC. From the Aten Temple, Karnak. The pharaoh is depicted wearing the blue crown or khepresh. After he ascended to the throne in c1350 BC Akhenaten (Amenhotep IV) set about transforming the religion of Ancient Egypt, replacing the existing polytheism with a monotheistic cult of worshipping Aten, the god of the disc of the Sun. In addition, he decreed that Egypt's capital was to be moved from Thebes to a new site 180 miles to the north, to be named Akhetaten (modern El-Amarna). These massive upheavals generated growing opposition to Akhenaten, particularly amongst the priesthood. In c1334 BC Akhenaten died and Egypt turned its back on his reforms. The city of Akhetaten was abandoned and Egyptians returned to worshipping their traditional gods From the Egyptian Museum, Berlin

© Werner Forman Archive/ Egyptian Museum, Berlin/Heritage-Images