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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Mohammed Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 42 pictures in our Mohammed collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Pilgrims Journeying to Mecca, 1890. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Pilgrims Journeying to Mecca, 1890. Creator: Unknown

Pilgrims Journeying to Mecca, 1890. The Hajj, annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the holiest city for Muslims, established by Muhammad in 632 AD, during medieval times, pilgrims gathered to make the journey in groups and caravans. From "Cassell's Illustrated Universal History, Vol. III - The Middle Ages", by Edmund Ollier. [Cassell and Company, Limited, London, Paris and Melbourne, 1890]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Page from the Sahansahname, a chronicle of Ottoman Sultans, written by Loqman, probably Featured Print

Page from the Sahansahname, a chronicle of Ottoman Sultans, written by Loqman, probably

Page from the Sahansahname, a chronicle of Ottoman Sultans, written by Loqman, probably illustrated by Nakkas Osman. Episodes from the circumcision ceremonies of the future Mehmed III, in 1582. An evening reception in the Eski Saray (old palace). Culture: Islamic. Date/Period: 1592 AD. Place of Origin: Turkey. Credit Line: Werner Forman Archive/ Topkapi Saray Museum, Istanbul MS B.200. Location: 07

© Werner Forman Archive / Heritage-Images

The ruins of the Mahdis tomb in Omdurman, Sudan, c1898. Artist: Newton & Co Featured Print

The ruins of the Mahdis tomb in Omdurman, Sudan, c1898. Artist: Newton & Co

The ruins of the Mahdi's tomb in Omdurman, Sudan, c1898. Muhammad Ahmad bin Abd Allah (1844-1885) was a Sudanese Muslim leader who, in 1881, proclaimed himself the Mahdi, the messianic redeemer of the Islamic faith. He led a rebellion against the Turkish/Egyptian government of the Sudan, which culminated in the capture of the capital city, Khartoum, in 1885. Muhammad Ahmad died shortly afterwards, and was buried in nearby Omdurman. After the fall of Khartoum, in which the British Governor-General of the Sudan, General Charles Gordon, was killed by Mahdist warriors, the British joined the Egyptians in preaparign to fight a war to drive out the Mahdists. They were eventually successful, winning a decisive battle at Omdurman in April 1898. The Mahdi's tomb was destroyed by the victors in order to prevent it from becoming a future rallying point for Mahdists, but was later rebuilt. Lantern slide

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images