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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Messenger Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 73 pictures in our Messenger collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Peace-maker, 1845. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Peace-maker, 1845. Creator: Unknown

Peace-maker, 1845. Maori man from New Zealand wearing traditional costume: ...a Herald, or Peace-maker...The Peace-maker's sole occupation is to carry messages between hostile chiefs, to prevent hostile meetings, and bring about treaties of peace. His person is held sacred under all circumstances'. From "Illustrated London News", 1845, Vol VII

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Kavanagh and Kunuji in the Swamp, 1857 (c1912) Featured Print

Kavanagh and Kunuji in the Swamp, 1857 (c1912)

Kavanagh and Kunuji in the Swamp, 1857 (c1912). During the Second Siege of Lucknow the defenders were able to send messengers to and from the Alambagh, from where in turn messengers could reach Cawnpore. A volunteer civil servant, Thomas Henry Kavanagh, disguised himself as a sepoy and ventured from the Residency aided by a local man named Kananji Lal. He and his scout crossed the entrenchments east of the city and reached the Alambagh. For this action, Kavanagh was awarded the Victoria Cross and was the first civilian in British history to be honoured with such an award for action during a military conflict. From The Romance of India, edited by Herbert Strang. [Hodder & Stoughton, London, c1912]

© The Print Collector

A messenger was seen spurring his horse toward the city, c1912 (1912). Artist: Ernest Dudley Heath Featured Print

A messenger was seen spurring his horse toward the city, c1912 (1912). Artist: Ernest Dudley Heath

A messenger was seen spurring his horse toward the city, c1912 (1912). Hasdrubal entrusted a letter with four soldiers to be placed in his brother Hannibal's hands. The soldiers were captured by Consul Claudius Nero's men, allowing the letter to fall into enemy hands, revealing Hasdrubal's battle plans. A messenger was sent from Consul Claudius Nero to Marcus Livius Drusus to expect his arrival and strategy to defeat Hasdrubal. From The Story of Rome, by Mary MacGregor. [Thomas Nelson and Sons Ltd., 1912]

© The Print Collector