Skip to main content
sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Message Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 108 pictures in our Message collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Wireless officer sending a message by Morse Code from on board a ship, 1916 Featured Print

Wireless officer sending a message by Morse Code from on board a ship, 1916

Wireless officer sending a message by morse code from on board a ship, 1916. Wireless telegraphy at sea was made possible by the type of sending and receiving station built by Marconi at Poldhu in Cornwall in 1901. Cover of All about Discoveries and Inventions, a book by F A Talbot. (London, 1916)

© Ann Ronan Picture Library / Heritage-Images

1910s, 20th Century, Ann Ronan Pictures, Century, Color, Colour, Communications, F A, F A Talbot, Guglielmo, Guglielmo Marconi, Guy, Headphones, Job, Male, Man, Marchese Guglielmo Marconi, Marconi, Men, Message, Morse Code, Occupation, People, Print Collector1, Profession, Radio, Radio Communications, Ship, Ships, Signal, Talbot, Telecommunication, Telecommunications, Telegraphy, Transmitter, Transport, Transportation, Water Transport, Wireless, Wireless Operator, Wireless Telegraphist

How the Titanic met with Disaster on her Maiden Voyage, April 20, 1912. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

How the Titanic met with Disaster on her Maiden Voyage, April 20, 1912. Creator: Unknown

How the Titanic met with Disaster on her Maiden Voyage, April 20, 1912. Map of the North Atlantic Ocean, with portraits of William Pirrie, chairman of Harland and Wolff who built the Titanic but missed sailing due to illness; the captain, Edward Smith, who went down with the ship; illustrations of the Titanic hitting the iceberg, and the ships that picked up her distress signals. The White Star Line ship RMS Titanic struck an iceberg in thick fog off Newfoundland on 14 April 1912. She was the largest and most luxurious ocean liner of her time, and claimed by Pirrie to be unsinkable. In the collision, five of her watertight compartments were compromised and she sank. Out of the 2228 people on board, only 705 survived. A major cause of the loss of life was the insufficient number of lifeboats she carried. Page 2 from "Titanic In Memoriam Number", a special supplement in "The Daily Graphic" newspaper issued following the sinking of the Titanic on 15 April 1912, published on 20 April 1912

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Facsimile of Message to the Public, 29 March 1912, (1913). Artist: Robert Falcon Scott Featured Print

Facsimile of Message to the Public, 29 March 1912, (1913). Artist: Robert Falcon Scott

Facsimile of Message to the Public, 29 March 1912, (1913). Final part of Robert F Scott's letter: We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course and the end cannot be far. It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. Scott. Last Entry: For God's sake, look after our people. The final expedition of British Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) left London on 1 June 1910 bound for the South Pole. The Terra Nova Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-1913), included a geologist, a zoologist, a surgeon, a photographer, an engineer, a ski expert, a meteorologist and a physicist among others. Scott wished to continue the scientific work that he had begun when leading the Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04. He also wanted to be the first to reach the geographic South Pole. Scott, accompanied by Dr Edward Wilson, Captain Lawrence Oates, Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Petty Officer Edgar Evans, reached the Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that the Norwegian expedition under Amundsen had beaten them to their objective by a month. Delayed by blizzards, and running out of supplies, Scott and the remainder of his team died at the end of March. Their bodies and diaries were found eight months later. From Scott's Last Expedition, Volume I. [Smith, Elder & Co., London, 1913]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images