Skip to main content
emoji_people
Please order early for Christmas to avoid disappointment. More details here...
card_giftcard
sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Marguerite Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 29 pictures in our Marguerite collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Queue outside the Palais de Justice during the trial of Marguerite Steinheil, Paris, France, 1909. Artist: Paul Charles Renouard Featured Print

Queue outside the Palais de Justice during the trial of Marguerite Steinheil, Paris, France, 1909. Artist: Paul Charles Renouard

Queue outside the Palais de Justice during the trial of Marguerite Steinheil, Paris, France, 1909. Marguerite Steinheil (1869-1954) became famous for her connection with the death in 1899 of President Felix Faure of France, whose mistress she had been. In 1908, Marguerite's stepmother and her husband were found murdered in their Paris home. Marguerite was found gagged and tied to a bed and claimed that she had been tied up by four intruders. The police suspected Marguerite of the murder, and she was arrested in November. The following year, after a sensational trial, she was acquitted. She then moved to London, writing her memoirs in 1912. A print from L'Illustration, 6 November 1909

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Marguerite Steinheil on trial, cover of L'Illustration, 6 November 1909. Artist: L Sabattier Featured Print

Marguerite Steinheil on trial, cover of L'Illustration, 6 November 1909. Artist: L Sabattier

Marguerite Steinheil on trial, cover of L'Illustration, 6 November 1909. Marguerite Steinheil (1869-1954) became famous for her connection with the death in 1899 of President Felix Faure of France, whose mistress she had been. In 1908, Marguerite's stepmother and her husband were found murdered in their Paris home. Marguerite was found gagged and tied to a bed and claimed that she had been tied up by four intruders. The police suspected Marguerite of the murder, and she was arrested in November. The following year, after a sensational trial, she was acquitted. She then moved to London, writing her memoirs in 1912

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images