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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Marching Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 288 pictures in our Marching collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Victory Day Procession, London, 19 July 1919, (c1920). Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Victory Day Procession, London, 19 July 1919, (c1920). Creator: Unknown

Victory Day Procession, London, 19 July 1919, (c1920). ...view in Whitehall as the naval section in the procession passed the Duke of Cambridge memorial - with the cenotaph, to "The Glorious Dead", in the distance'. Crowds pack the streets for Peace Day celebrations to mark the end of the First World War. In the background are the Big Ben clock tower and the Palace of Westminster. From "The Great World War: A History", Volume IX, edited by Frank A Mumby. [The Gresham Publishing Company Ltd, London, c1920]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Captain William Redmond leading Irish troops at the Front, First World War, 1916, (c1920) Featured Print

Captain William Redmond leading Irish troops at the Front, First World War, 1916, (c1920)

Captain William Redmond leading Irish troops at the Front, First World War, 1916, (c1920). While the Sinn Feiners were rebelling in Ireland: Captain William Redmond, M.P. [1886-1932], brother of Mr. John Redmond, leading Irish troops at the Front..."Is it not an additional horror", said the Irish leader, Mr. John Redmond, "that on the very day when we hear that men of the Dublin Fusiliers have been killed by Irishmen in the streets of Dublin, we receive the news of how the men of the 16th division - our own Irish Brigade, and of the same Dublin Fusiliers - had dashed forward and by the unconquerable bravery retaken the trenches that the Germans had won at Hulluch [in northern France]?" Drawn by S. Begg from an official photograph. From "The Great World War: A History", Volume V, edited by Frank A Mumby. [The Gresham Publishing Company Ltd, London, c1920]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

At A Balloon Centre, c1943. Creator: Cecil Beaton Featured Print

At A Balloon Centre, c1943. Creator: Cecil Beaton

At A Balloon Centre, c1943. Barrage balloons were used to defend against attack by enemy aircraft. They were raised aloft on cables to create a risk of collision, making the attacker's approach more difficult. The Women's Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF), whose members were referred to as WAAFs, was the female auxiliary of the British Royal Air Force during World War II. Its members did not serve as aircrew, but although they did not participate in active combat, they were exposed to the same dangers as any on the home front working at military installations. Among their duties were: crewing of barrage balloons, catering, meteorology, radar, aircraft maintenance, transport, communications duties including wireless telephonic and telegraphic operation. At its peak strength, in 1943, the number of WAAFs (members of the force) exceeded 180,000, with over 2,000 women enlisting per week. From "Wings On Her Shoulders", by Katharine Bentley Beauman, Late Fight Officer W.A.A.F. [Hutchinson & Co Ltd, London, New York, Melbourne, c1943]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images