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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Lieutenant Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 86 pictures in our Lieutenant collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


St Thomas's West Indies, from Weight's Wharf, 1844. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

St Thomas's West Indies, from Weight's Wharf, 1844. Creator: Unknown

St Thomas's West Indies, from Weight's Wharf, 1844. The New York American publishes an extract of a letter dated from this island, April 14, which states that the negroes had broken into Aux Cayes, and murdered the whites and coloured; that the President Herard had been murdered; and that a similar attempt at Port-au-Prince was apprehended...everything was in confusion - civil war raging through the country.
There had been a battle in the neighbourhood of Aux Cayes between the Government troops and the insurgents, which resulted in the defeat of the former; and subsequently the principal part of the town was in the possession of the rebels. There was great distress and terror experienced. The women and children had taken refuge on board the American and English vessels in port. It was supposed that they would fire the town, the whole island being in a state of uproar...St. Thomas is one of the three Danish Virgin Islands, and is about twelve miles long...Most of the white inhabitants are of Dutch origin, and Dutch is the common language. The plantations have yielded in one year 20,000 cwt. of sugar, 54,000 gallons of rum, 18,000 gallons of molasses, and some cotton. But as large tracts are unfit for the production of colonial articles, maize, ground provisions, and fruits are cultivated to a considerable extent...Our illustration has been engraved from an effective drawing, by Lieutenant Bellairs, R.N.'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol I

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Lieutenant Evans in the Crows Nest, c1910–1913, (1913). Artist: Herbert Ponting Featured Print

Lieutenant Evans in the Crows Nest, c1910–1913, (1913). Artist: Herbert Ponting

Lieutenant Evans in the Crow's Nest, c1910–1913, (1913). Edward Ratcliffe Garth Russell Teddy Evans (1880-1957), navigator and second in command, Captain of the Terra Nova, Lieutenant, Royal Navy. The final expedition of British Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) left London on 1 June 1910 bound for the South Pole. The Terra Nova Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-1913), included a geologist, a zoologist, a surgeon, a photographer, an engineer, a ski expert, a meteorologist and a physicist among others. Scott wished to continue the scientific work that he had begun when leading the Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04. He also wanted to be the first to reach the geographic South Pole. Scott, accompanied by Dr Edward Wilson, Captain Lawrence Oates, Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Petty Officer Edgar Evans, reached the Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that the Norwegian expedition under Amundsen had beaten them to their objective by a month. Delayed by blizzards, and running out of supplies, Scott and the remainder of his team died at the end of March. Their bodies and diaries were found eight months later. From Scott's Last Expedition, Volume I. [Smith, Elder & Co., London, 1913]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Lieut. General Sir John Moore, K.B., c1809 (1909). Artist: Charles Turner Featured Print

Lieut. General Sir John Moore, K.B., c1809 (1909). Artist: Charles Turner

Lieut. General Sir John Moore, K.B., c1809 (1909). After Thomas Lawrence (1769-1830). General Sir John Moore (1761-1809) commanded the British forces at the Battle of Corunna (La Coruna), Peninsular War, Spain 16 January 1809. Retreating from a much larger French army commanded by Marshal Soult, the British were able to hold the French off long enough to be evacuated by sea. Moore was mortally wounded in the battle. He was the subject of Charles Wolfe's poem The Burial of Sir John Moore, published in 1817. From British Military Prints, by Ralph Nevill. [The Connoisseur, London, 1909]

© The Print Collector