sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Leadership Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 133 pictures in our Leadership collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

'"Robert Walpole, Earl of Orford." From the original of Jarvis, in the

'Robert Walpole, Earl of Orford', 1725, (early-mid 19th century). Portrait of Sir Robert Walpole, Earl of Orford, English statesman. Although the title was never used to refer to him at the time, Walpole (1676-1745) is regarded as Britain's first Prime Minister. His administration lasted from 1721 until he resigned in 1742, longer than that of any Prime Minister since. Engraving after a painting by Charles Jervas commissioned by Walpole in 1725 as a gift for his one of his supporters, it shows him as Chancellor of the Exchequer standing beside the embroidered silk purse of the Chancellor of the Exchequer's Seal. 'From the original of Jarvis, in the collection of Thomas Walpole, Esquire'. [The London Printing and Publishing Company, London]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Featured Print

'Willliam III. At the Boyne', 1690, (c1880). Artist: Unknown

'Willliam III. At the Boyne', 1690, (c1880). The Battle of the Boyne was a battle in 1690 between the English King James II, and the Dutch Prince William of Orange, who, with his wife, Mary II (his cousin and James's daughter), had overthrown James in England in 1688. The battle took place across the River Boyne near the town of Drogheda on the east coast of Irelandand resulted in a victory for William. From British Battles on Land and Sea, Vol. I, by James Grant. [Cassell Petter & Galpin, London, Paris & New York, c1880]. (Colorised black and white print).

© The Print Collector

Featured Print

'Looking down upon the stream, he stood awhile deep in thought', c1912 (1912). Artist: Unknown

'Looking down upon the stream, he stood awhile deep in thought', c1912 (1912). Julius Caesar sailed to Epirus with seven legions of his army, leaving the rest under the command of Mark Antony to follow as soon as enough ships were available. Caesar waited for months for Antony's remaining men to arrive, before returning to Rome in disguise to retrieve the troops himself. From The Story of Rome, by Mary MacGregor. [Thomas Nelson and Sons Ltd., 1912]

© The Print Collector