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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Laboratory Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 79 pictures in our Laboratory collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Mawsons Chemical Laboratory, c1908, (1909) Featured Print

Mawsons Chemical Laboratory, c1908, (1909)

Mawson's Chemical Laboratory. The bottles were coated with ice by condensation from the warm, moist air of the hut, c1908, (1909). The frozen laboratory of expedition physicist Douglas Mawson. Anglo-Irish explorer Ernest Shackleton (1874-1922) made three expeditions to the Antarctic. During the second expedition, 1907-1909, he and three companions established a new record, Farthest South latitude at 88°S, only 97 geographical miles (112 statute miles, or 180 km) from the South Pole, the largest advance to the pole in exploration history. Members of his team also climbed Mount Erebus, the most active volcano in the Antarctic. Shackleton was knighted by King Edward VII for these achievements. He died during his third and last oceanographic and sub-antarctic expedition, aged 47. Illustration from The Heart of the Antarctic, Vol. I, by E. H. Shackleton, C.V.O. [William Heinemann, London, 1909]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Dr. Simpson in his Laboratory, 21 December 1911, (1913). Artist: Herbert Ponting Featured Print

Dr. Simpson in his Laboratory, 21 December 1911, (1913). Artist: Herbert Ponting

Dr. Simpson in his Laboratory, 21 December 1911, (1913). Meteorologist George Simpson (1878-1965) took detailed measurements in order to predict the best possible conditions for Scott's journey to the Pole. The final expedition of British Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) left London on 1 June 1910 bound for the South Pole. The Terra Nova Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-1913), included a geologist, a zoologist, a surgeon, a photographer, an engineer, a ski expert, a meteorologist and a physicist among others. Scott wished to continue the scientific work that he had begun when leading the Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04. He also wanted to be the first to reach the geographic South Pole. Scott, accompanied by Dr Edward Wilson, Captain Lawrence Oates, Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Petty Officer Edgar Evans, reached the Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that the Norwegian expedition under Amundsen had beaten them to their objective by a month. Delayed by blizzards, and running out of supplies, Scott and the remainder of his team died at the end of March. Their bodies and diaries were found eight months later. From Scott's Last Expedition, Volume II. [Smith, Elder & Co., London, 1913]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Thomas Alva Edison, American inventor and businessman, 1926 Featured Print

Thomas Alva Edison, American inventor and businessman, 1926

Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931), American inventor and businessman, 1926. Edison developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph and a long lasting light bulb. Dubbed The Wizard of Menlo Park by a newspaper reporter, he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production to the process of invention, and therefore is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory. Edison is considered one of the most prolific inventors in history, holding 1093 US patents in his name, as well as many patents in the United Kingdom, France and Germany. From An Outline of Christianity, The Story of Our Civilisation, volume 4: Christianity and Modern Thought, edited by RG Parsons and AS Peake, published by the Waverley Book Club (London, 1926)

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images