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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Kitchenware Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 29 pictures in our Kitchenware collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


'Sadiron; tongs; skimmer, fork; trivets and copper chopping-dish', c18th century, (1937) Featured Print

'Sadiron; tongs; skimmer, fork; trivets and copper chopping-dish', c18th century, (1937)

'One sadiron; one charcoal tongs; ladies, skimmer, and fork; two trivets; copper chopping-dish', c18th century, (1937). From "History of American Costume - Book One 1607-1800", by Elisabeth McClellan. [Tudor Publishing Company, New York, 1937]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

18th Century, 1930s, 20th Century, America, American, Antique, Arts, Assorted, Assortment, B And W, Black And White, Book, Bw, Century, Colonial, Colonialism, Company, Company Tudor Publishing, Concept, Copper, Country, Crockery, Cutlery, Dish, Domestic, Eighteenth Century, Elisabeth, Elisabeth Mcclellan, Fork, Historic, History, History Of American Costume, Household, Image, Iron, Kitchen, Kitchen Equipment, Kitchenware, Laundry, Literature, Location, Mcclellan, Mcclellan Elisabeth, Metal, Object, Old Fashioned, Sadiron, Spoon, Studio Shot, The Print Collector, Thirties, Tongs, Tool, Tools, Trivet, Tudor Publishing, Tudor Publishing Company, United States, United States Of America, Unknown, Usa, Utensil

James Boswell, his wife, and Dr Johnson at tea in Edinburgh, 1773, (1786). Artist: Thomas Rowlandson Featured Print

James Boswell, his wife, and Dr Johnson at tea in Edinburgh, 1773, (1786). Artist: Thomas Rowlandson

James Boswell, his wife, and Dr Johnson at tea in Edinburgh, 1773, (1786). Scots writer James Boswell and his wife Margaret at tea with English lexicographer Dr Samuel Johnson. Boswell wrote: My wife had tea ready for him, which it is well known he delighted to drink at all hours, particularly when sitting up late. He shewed much complacency upon finding that the mistress of the house was so attentive to his singular habit; and as no man could be more polite when he chose to be so, his address to her was most courteous and engaging; and his conversation soon charmed her into a forgetfulness of his external appearance. Illustration from Social Caricature in the Eighteenth Century ... With over two hundred illustrations by George Paston [pseudonym of Emily Morse Symonds], (London, 1905).

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images