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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Journalism Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 155 pictures in our Journalism collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Raynal, (1713-1796), 1830. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Raynal, (1713-1796), 1830. Creator: Unknown

Raynal, (1713-1796), 1830. Guillaume Thomas Raynall (1713-1796) French writer and man of letters during the Age of Enlightenment, educated as a Jesuit he received priest's orders, but was dismissed and became a writer and journalist, elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1754. From "Biographical Illustrations", by Alfred Howard. [Thomas Tegg, R. Griffin and Co., J. Cumming, London, Glasgow and Dublin, 1830]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Creelman, just after Dismounting from Horse..., Spanish-American War, 4 July 1898, (1899) Featured Print

Creelman, just after Dismounting from Horse..., Spanish-American War, 4 July 1898, (1899)

Creelman, just after Dismounting from Horse..., Spanish-American War, 4 July 1898, (1899). Creelman, just after Dismounting from Horse which had Carried him from Hospital, Eleven Miles away, July 4th: Last Picture I Took in Cuba'. While a war correspondent for the "New York Journal", Canadian-American writer James Creelman (1859-1915) started off for El Caney, where he distinguished himself by very foolhardy work and reckless bravery; it was he who pulled down the Spanish flag from the block-house. Creelman was permitted by the U.S. general in command to join the charge on a blockhouse occupied by Spanish troops. Advancing with US troops, and seeing the Spanish flag lying on the ground, Creelman seized it, feeling that the "Journal" should be the first to capture the enemy flag. He waved it in front of Spanish soldiers who responded with gunfire, wounding him in the arm and back. From "The Little I saw of Cuba" by Burr McIntosh, with photographs by the author. (In 1898, American actor and journalist William Burr McIntosh went to Cuba to cover the Spanish-American War for "Leslie's Weekly" as a reporter and photographer). [F. Tennyson Neely, London & New York, 1899]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

The Awful News at Lloyd's, with portraits of some of those on board the Titanic Featured Print

The Awful News at Lloyd's, with portraits of some of those on board the Titanic

The Awful News at Lloyd's, with portraits of some of those on board the Titanic, April 20, 1912. People receiving news of the disaster at Lloyd's insurance offices in London, with portraits of passengers including British author and journalist William Thomas Stead (1849-1912). Some of Stead's articles appeared to anticipate the sinking of the Titanic'. The White Star Line ship RMS Titanic struck an iceberg in thick fog off Newfoundland on 14 April 1912. She was the largest and most luxurious ocean liner of her time, and thought to be unsinkable. In the collision, five of her watertight compartments were compromised and she sank. Out of the 2228 people on board, only 705 survived. A major cause of the loss of life was the insufficient number of lifeboats she carried. Page 16, from "Titanic In Memoriam Number", a special supplement in "The Daily Graphic" newspaper issued following the sinking of the Titanic on 15 April 1912, published on 20 April 1912

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images