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James Sangster And Collection

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Kings College Chapel, Cambridge, 1864

Kings College Chapel, Cambridge, 1864. Late Gothic edifice with a vast fan vaulted ceiling with ornate stained glass windows

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: The Coronation Chair, c1845, (1864)

The Coronation Chair, c1845, (1864). The Coronation Chair, known historically as St Edwards Chair or King Edwards Chair, is a wooden throne on which the British monarch sits when he or she is

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Battle of Flodden, (1513), c1910

Battle of Flodden, (1513), c1910
The Battle of Flodden or Flodden Field was a conflict between England and Scotland. The battle was fought in the county of Northumberland in northern England on 9 September 1513

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Knights Templar on the Field of Battle, c1910

Knights Templar on the Field of Battle, c1910. The Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon, commonly known as the Knights Templar or Templars

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Christ Church Hall, Oxford, c1845, (1864)

Christ Church Hall, Oxford, c1845, (1864). From Old England: A Pictorial Museum of Regal, Ecclesiastical, Municipal, Baronial, and Popular Antiquities, edited by Charles Knight

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Chantry Chapel, c1845, (1864)

Chantry Chapel, c1845, (1864). After Thomas Scandrett (1797-1870). From Old England: A Pictorial Museum of Regal, Ecclesiastical, Municipal, Baronial, and Popular Antiquities

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: St. Johns College Chapel, Cambridge, c1845, (1864)

St. Johns College Chapel, Cambridge, c1845, (1864). From Old England: A Pictorial Museum of Regal, Ecclesiastical, Municipal, Baronial, and Popular Antiquities, edited by Charles Knight

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: St. Georges Hall, Windsor, c1845, (1864)

St. Georges Hall, Windsor, c1845, (1864). St Georges Hall is the largest green-oak structure built since the Middle Ages

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Interior of the Temple Church, c1845, (1864)

Interior of the Temple Church, c1845, (1864). The Temple Church is a late 12th-century church in the City of London located between Fleet Street and the River Thames

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Rochester Castle. - Interior, c1845, (1864)

Rochester Castle. - Interior, c1845, (1864). 12th-century keep or stone tower, which is the castles most prominent feature, is one of the best preserved in England

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Whitehall Chapel, c1845, (1864)

Whitehall Chapel, c1845, (1864). From Old England: A Pictorial Museum of Regal, Ecclesiastical, Municipal, Baronial, and Popular Antiquities, edited by Charles Knight. [James Sangster and Co

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Westminster Abbey. - Henry The Sevenths Chapel, c1845, (1864)

Westminster Abbey. - Henry The Sevenths Chapel, c1845, (1864). The structure of the chapel is a three-aisled nave composed of four bays

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Entrance to the Chapel of Edward the Confessor, c1840, (1864)

Entrance to the Chapel of Edward the Confessor, c1840, (1864). Edward the Confessor, (1003-1066), also known as Saint Edward the Confessor, was among the last Anglo-Saxon kings of England

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Elizabethan Sideboard or Court Cupboard, c1845, (1864)

Elizabethan Sideboard or Court Cupboard, c1845, (1864). From Old England: A Pictorial Museum of Regal, Ecclesiastical, Municipal, Baronial, and Popular Antiquities, edited by Charles Knight

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Methley Hall, c1845, (1864)

Methley Hall, c1845, (1864). Former seat of the Earl of Mexborough. After Thomas Scandrett (1797-1870). From Old England: A Pictorial Museum of Regal, Ecclesiastical, Municipal, Baronial

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Tomb of Queen Elizabeth. - Westminster Abbey, c1845, (1864)

Tomb of Queen Elizabeth. - Westminster Abbey, c1845, (1864)
Tomb of Queen Elizabeth. - Westminster Abbey, c1845 (1864). From Old England: A Pictorial Museum of Regal, Ecclesiastical, Municipal, Baronial, and Popular Antiquities, edited by Charles Knight

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Tomb of Sir Francis Vere in Westminster Abbey, c1845, (1864)

Tomb of Sir Francis Vere in Westminster Abbey, c1845, (1864). Sir Francis Vere (c1560-1609) was an English soldier, famed for his military career

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: The Bodleian Library, Oxford, c1845, (1864)

The Bodleian Library, Oxford, c1845, (1864). The Bodleian Library is the main research library of the University of Oxford, and one of the oldest libraries in Europe

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Painted Screen, St. Georges Chapel, c1845, (1864)

Painted Screen, St. Georges Chapel, c1845, (1864). From Old England: A Pictorial Museum of Regal, Ecclesiastical, Municipal, Baronial, and Popular Antiquities, edited by Charles Knight

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Palit Confesses His Guilt, c1910

Palit Confesses His Guilt, c1910. Palit confessing the muder of her son to Mrs. Hamilton during the Indian Mutiny. Colonel Hamilton was in fact found alive at a later date by his brother

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: The Last Glimpse of Home, (1633-1701), c1910

The Last Glimpse of Home, (1633-1701), c1910
The Last Glimpse of Home, c1910. When James II and VII (1633-1701) was exiled to France a small body of English and Scottish gentlemen went into exile with him

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Charles I, on His Way to the Scaffold, (1649), c1910

Charles I, on His Way to the Scaffold, (1649), c1910
Charles I (1600-1649) was monarch of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. On the day of his execution he walked under guard from St Jamess Palace

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: A Gentleman of the Stuart Period, (17th century), c1910

A Gentleman of the Stuart Period, (17th century), c1910
A Gentleman of the Stuart Period, c1910. The Stuart period usually refers to the period between 1603 and 1714 and sometimes from 1371 in Scotland

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: John Gutenberg Showing Part of the First Printed Book to Faust, (14th century), c1910

John Gutenberg Showing Part of the First Printed Book to Faust, (14th century), c1910
John Gutenberg Showing Part of the First Printed Book to Faust, c1910. Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (c1398-1468) was a German blacksmith, goldsmith, printer

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Otterburn - The Advance of Hotspur, (1388), c1910

Otterburn - The Advance of Hotspur, (1388), c1910
Otterburn - The Advance of Hotspur, c1910. Sir Henry Percy (1364-1403), commonly known as Sir Harry Hotspur, was known as one of the most valiant knights of his day

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: The Lobby of the House of Commons, c1910

The Lobby of the House of Commons, c1910
The Members Lobby is a hallway in the Palace of Westminster used by members of the House of Commons, the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Christopher Columbus, (1451-1506), c1910

Christopher Columbus, (1451-1506), c1910
Christopher Columbus, Genoese navigator and explorer. Sponsored by Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain, Columbus (1451-1506) set out in 1492 to discover a westward route to Asia

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: The Return of Warbeck, c1910

The Return of Warbeck, c1910. An illustration of the legendary character Warbeck of Wolfstein. From a Pictorial Record of Remarkable Events in The History of the World

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Roman Lady and Slaves, c1910

Roman Lady and Slaves, c1910. Slavery in ancient Rome played an important role in Roman society and economy. Slaves performed many domestic services

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: Catherine Douglas Barring the Door, (15th century), c1910

Catherine Douglas Barring the Door, (15th century), c1910
Catherine Douglas, later Catherine Kate Barlass, was a historical figure who tried to prevent the assassination of King James I of Scotland (1394-1437) on February 20, 1437

Background imageJames Sangster And Collection: The Finding of Hamilton at Lucknow, c1910

The Finding of Hamilton at Lucknow, c1910. The discovery of Colonel Hamilton by his brother after he was initially thought to have died during the Indian Mutiny


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