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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Information Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 88 pictures in our Information collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Front page of Mercurius Civicus: Londons Intelligencer , February 1643, (1945) Featured Print

Front page of Mercurius Civicus: Londons Intelligencer , February 1643, (1945)

Front page of "Mercurius Civicus: London's Intelligencer", February 1643, (1945). Portraits of King Charles I and Queen Henrietta Maria, with news of the Civil War: Letters intercepted from the King, Queene, L. Digby [George Digby], and Iermin [Henry Jermyn], to the Lord Goring in France. "Bandon-bridge neere Chester taken by Sir Thomas Fairfax. The Irish Rebels joyned with Cardinall Williams in Wales"...The interest which every good subject hath in the actions of the King and Parliament, is sufficient to defend him from the imputation of being a Busie-bodie, in maintaining the Justice of them, That, and my desire not onely to give satisfaction unto my countrymen in the most certaine intelligence that should come to my hands, but also to admonish (especially the City... "Mercurius Civicus: Londons Intelligencer, or, Truth impartially related from thence to the whole Kingdome to prevent mis-information" was a weekly newspaper which supported the Roundhead (Parliamentary) cause. It was published by John Wright and Thomas Bates between 1643 and 1646. From "British Journalists and Newspapers", by Derek Hudson. [Collins, London, 1945]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Liner in a field of ice, and people waiting for news of the Titanic disaster, April 20, 1912 Featured Print

Liner in a field of ice, and people waiting for news of the Titanic disaster, April 20, 1912

Liner in a field of ice, and people waiting for news of the Titanic disaster, April 20, 1912. A Liner Threading Her Way Through a Field of Ice in the North Atlantic, and The Hours of Awful Suspense in London - relatives and friends at the White Star Line offices at Oceanic House, Cockspur Street. The White Star Line ship RMS Titanic struck an iceberg in thick fog off Newfoundland on 14 April 1912. She was the largest and most luxurious ocean liner of her time, and thought to be unsinkable. In the collision, five of her watertight compartments were compromised and she sank. Out of the 2228 people on board, only 705 survived. A major cause of the loss of life was the insufficient number of lifeboats she carried. Page 14, from "Titanic In Memoriam Number", a special supplement in "The Daily Graphic" newspaper issued following the sinking of the Titanic on 15 April 1912, published on 20 April 1912

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Carved trees, 1951. Creator: Shirley Markham Featured Print

Carved trees, 1951. Creator: Shirley Markham

Carved trees, 1951. Illustration for Ministry of Agriculture information leaflet. Shirley Markham (1931-1999) studied Graphic Design and Illustration at Central School of Art in London from 1950-1952. The writer, artist, poet, and illustrator Mervyn Peake (1911-1968) was one of her tutors, and her style of drawing was also influenced by other British illustrators such as Edward Ardizzone, Quentin Blake and Edward Bawden. Markham spent time in the Dolomite Mountains in Italy, and also visited Rome, sketching classical buildings. After graduating from Central, she worked as a graphic designer, producing book illustrations, cartoons for comics, menus and programmes. She gave up her promising career however when she got married in 1957. Middle-class women at that time were expected to devote their energies to bringing up children and running the home, and despite her obvious talent, she lacked the confidence to return to illustration. Her portfolio remained in the family attic for many years, but now her work is published here for the first time

© Shirley Markham Collection / Heritage-Images