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His Majesty Gallery

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King Cetewayo, 1902
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King Cetewayo, 1902
Charles I and Speaker Lenthall, c1850, (1947). Creator: Unknown Featured Image

Charles I and Speaker Lenthall, c1850, (1947). Creator: Unknown

Charles I and Speaker Lenthall, c1850, (1947). On 4 January 1642, King Charles I (1600-1649, standing, in hat) entered the House of Commons to arrest five Members of Parliament for high treason. Speaker William Lenthall (1591-1662) defied the King to uphold the privileges of Parliament. The King had to leave without arresting the Five Members. No monarch has entered the House of Commons since then. After Speaker Lenthall Asserting the Privileges of the Commons Against Charles I when the Attempt was made to Seize the Five Members, painting by Charles West Cope in the Palace of Westminster in London. From "The House of Commons", by Martin Lindsay M.P. [Collins, London, 1947]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Edwy and Elgiva, (mid 19th century). Creator: J Rogers Featured Image

Edwy and Elgiva, (mid 19th century). Creator: J Rogers

Edwy and Elgiva, (mid 19th century). Depiction of a scene from early British history: Queen Elgiva and King Eadwig are reproved by priests, possibly Archbishop Odo and/or Saint Dunstan, on the day of Eadwig's consecration as king. Edwy All-Fair or Eadwig (c941-959 AD) was the King of England from 955 until his death. He was married briefly to Aelfgifu or Elgiva (ruled 955-959). Engraving after a work of the late 18th century. [John Tallis & Company, London & New York]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

The death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, (1944). Creator: Unknown Featured Image

The death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, (1944). Creator: Unknown

The death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, (1944). The Latin reads: Harold Rex Interfectus Est - King Harold is killed. English forces led by King Harold II fought the invading Normans under William I. It has been suggested that the arrow in the eye account of Harold's death was deliberately invented by the Normans as an attempt to legitimise William's siezure of the English crown, by portraying Harold as having been struck down by God as punishment for his breaking of his oath to William. Detail from the Bayeux Tapestry, the famous embroidery made a few years after the Norman invasion of England in 1066. From "Battlefields in Britain, by C. V. Wedgwood. [Collins, London, 1944]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images


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