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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Himachal Pradesh Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 86 pictures in our Himachal Pradesh collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

The Churning of the Ocean of Milk, ca. 1780-90. Creator: Unknown

The Churning of the Ocean of Milk, ca. 1780-90. At the time of the great deluge aeons ago, many treasures— including amrita, the nectar of immortality—were lost beneath the primordial ocean. Gods and demons still jockeying for power decided to raise these powerful objects from the watery depths. They harnessed the serpent Vasuki as a rope to turn Mount Mandara and Vishnu assumed his tortoise avatar to support the giant pivot. The demons, tricked into pulling the head of the snake, were weakened by its poisonous breath. Here, many of the treasures have already been raised and are visible in the sky, while Vishnu is seen twice, below and atop the peak.

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Featured Print

Vishnu Battles Madhu and Kaitabha, from a Markandeya Purana, c. 1760. Creator: Unknown

Vishnu Battles Madhu and Kaitabha, from a Markandeya Purana, c. 1760. This scene from a Hindu text is set during the moments before the creation of the world. The four-armed god Vishnu has just awakened on his multiheaded serpent bed that floats on the cosmic ocean of milk. Two demons generated from his earwax, according to the text, have already begun a primordial battle between good and evil. In the foothills of the western Himalayas there were numerous small kingdoms governed by rulers who paid tribute to the Mughal emperor. The rulers of these Pahari kingdoms, including Guler, began to sponsor workshops of court painters during the 1600s, following the model of the imperial Mughal atelier. Each court developed its own painting style; at Guler, unpopulated pale expanses offset the opaque hues of clustered figures delineated by smooth contour lines.

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Featured Print

The Morning Toilette, 1810-25. Creator: Unknown

The Morning Toilette, 1810-25. The woman featured in the center embodies the poetic ideal of a female beauty, called a nayika, which translates as "heroine," though she is not an individual from a specific story. In this scene four handmaidens attend to her after the bath. One dries her leg with a white cloth, and another brings her garments for the day folded neatly in a basin. A third holds a mirror for her to use while putting on her jewelry, selected from the box brought by the fourth attendant. The pots of bath water are amid the flowering plants in front of the hexagonal stool on which she stands. The kings of Chamba, a territory deep in the western Himalayas, employed artists from their neighboring kingdom of Guler to create paintings such as this for their royal collections to be viewed for enjoyment in private court gatherings of men and women. Stylistically, Guler artists had close links with imperial Mughal painting traditions prevalent in the Punjab plains to the west, which resulted in the relatively naturalistic setting and figural proportions.

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images