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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Dyke

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 142 pictures in our Dyke collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

'Jesus said, Were there not ten cleansed? But where are the nine?', mid 19th century

'Jesus said, Were there not ten cleansed? But where are the nine?', mid 19th century. Biblical scene, from Luke 17: 17: 'And Jesus answering said, Were there not ten cleansed? but where are the nine? Was no one found except this foreigner to return and give glory to God?' Jesus performs the miracle of healing ten lepers, but only one man returns to thank him. Engraving after 'Christ Healing the Paralytic', a painting made c1619 by Anthony van Dyck, in the Royal Collection.

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Featured Print

'Prince Rupert', c1640, (early-mid 19th century). Creator: J Cochran

'Prince Rupert', c1640, (early-mid 19th century). Portrait of Prince Rupert, Royalist cavalry commander of the English Civil War. Rupert (1619-1682) was the third son of the Elector Palatine Frederick V and Elizabeth, daughter of James VI of Scotland. In 1642 he came to England and fought for the Royalists in the Civil War. He spent his last years conducting chemical, physical and mechanical researches, including work on mezzotint methods, gunpowder and alloys. 'From the original of Vandyke in the collection of The Right Honourable The Earl of Craven'. [The London Printing and Publishing Company, London]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Featured Print

'Offa's Dyke crossing a hill top, in Denbighshire', Wales, 1935. Artist: Unknown

'Offa's Dyke crossing a hill top, in Denbighshire', Wales, 1935. View of the large linear earthwork, known as Offa's Dyke, which roughly follows the current border between England and Wales. Offa, the Anglo-Saxon king of Mercia from 757 until 796 AD, is traditionally believed to have ordered its construction. From A History of the Anglo-Saxons, Vol. II, by R. H. Hodgkin. [The Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1935]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images