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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Digging Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 108 pictures in our Digging collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Fleet-Street, deepening the sewer, 1845. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Fleet-Street, deepening the sewer, 1845. Creator: Unknown

Fleet-Street, deepening the sewer, 1845. Workers improving the underground waste system in London, with Temple Bar in the distance. ...the difficulty of keeping open the traffic, so as not to extinguish the "very animated appearance" of Fleet-street, is a work of much difficulty. The cost of the present undertaking, contracted for by Messrs. Ward and Son, of Aldersgate- street, is £2000...There do not appear to be published data from which the total extent of the metropolitan Sewers can be ascertained. The Holbom and Finsbury divisions contain eighty three miles. In addition to these, there are sixteen miles of smaller Sewers, to carry off the surface-water from the streets and roads, and two hundred and fifty-four miles of drains leading from houses to the main Sewers'. From "Illustrated London News", 1845, Vol VII

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

The Old Church of St. James, Clerkenwell, (c1872). Creator: Unknown Featured Print

The Old Church of St. James, Clerkenwell, (c1872). Creator: Unknown

The Old Church of St. James, Clerkenwell, (c1872). St James Clerkenwell in London was founded in the 12th century as the church of the nunnery of St Mary. The building seen here was a mix of 17th and 18th century additions in various styles grafted onto the remains of the medieval nunnery church. It was taken down to make way for a new church in 1788. From Old and New London, Vol. II: A Narrative of Its History, Its People, and Its Places, by Walter Thornbury. [Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., London, Paris & New York]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Lieut. Evans and Nelson Cutting a Cave for Cold Storage, 12 January 1911, (1913) Featured Print

Lieut. Evans and Nelson Cutting a Cave for Cold Storage, 12 January 1911, (1913)

Lieut. Evans and Nelson Cutting a Cave for Cold Storage, 12 January 1911, (1913). Petty officer Edgar Evans and biologist Edward W Nelson making an ice-cave. One of them is sitting on a box of Horlicks malted milk. The final expedition of British Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) left London on 1 June 1910 bound for the South Pole. The Terra Nova Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-1913), included a geologist, a zoologist, a surgeon, a photographer, an engineer, a ski expert, a meteorologist and a physicist among others. Scott wished to continue the scientific work that he had begun when leading the Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04. He also wanted to be the first to reach the geographic South Pole. Scott, accompanied by Dr Edward Wilson, Captain Lawrence Oates, Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Petty Officer Edgar Evans, reached the Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that the Norwegian expedition under Amundsen had beaten them to their objective by a month. Delayed by blizzards, and running out of supplies, Scott and the remainder of his team died at the end of March. Their bodies and diaries were found eight months later. From Scott's Last Expedition, Volume I. [Smith, Elder & Co., London, 1913]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images