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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Comet Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 41 pictures in our Comet collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The New Comet, drawn at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, 1844. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

The New Comet, drawn at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, 1844. Creator: Unknown

The New Comet, drawn at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, 1844. In its course towards the sun, it is rapidly approaching the earth, a circumstance which has caused timid and visionary people some alarm. The fever of apprehension is not, however, so great as that which disturbed the Patisian population in 1773, when a similar phenomenon occurred. On that occasion, many persons are said to have died of fright; while numbers prepared for the worst by purchasing - what were offered at high premiums - places in paradise. To relieve the fear of such a catastrophe, we may inform the public of the result of some very curious and elaborate calculations made by Arago to show the extremely small probability of a contact between ourselves and any comet whatever'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol V

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Sir William Herschel, German-born British astronomer, (c1900) Featured Print

Sir William Herschel, German-born British astronomer, (c1900)

Sir William Herschel, German-born British astronomer, (c1900). Portrait of Herschel and the Comet of 1831. Herschel (1738-1822) constructed his own telescope after taking up astronomy as a hobby. As well as discovering the planet Uranus in 1781 and two of its satellites, he performed a major study of Saturn. He discovered two satellites, the rotation of the planetary rings and the period of the planet's rotation. He also catalogued and investigated the motions of binary stars, the results of which are still in use. Trade card, one from a series on astronomers produced by Liebig extract of meat, (c1900)

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Comet Shoemaker-Levy colliding with Jupiter, 20 July 1994 Featured Print

Comet Shoemaker-Levy colliding with Jupiter, 20 July 1994

Comet Shoemaker-Levy colliding with Jupiter, 20 July 1994. Between 16 and 22 July 1994, some 20 fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 struck the atmosphere of Jupiter, creating disturbances which remained visible to astronomers for several days. The largest impact released energy equivalent to an estimated 6 million megatons of TNT and left a mark in the Jovian atmosphere larger than the diameter of the Earth. Astronomers believe that Jupiter plays a vital role in intercepting cosmic debris that might otherwise have reached the inner solar system, enabling the unbroken development of life on Earth to have occurred. Impact with Jupiter 20 July 1994. Photograph taken from Cape Town, South Africa

© Oxford Science Archive / Heritage-Images