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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Coal Miner Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 127 pictures in our Coal Miner collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Creator: Unknown Featured Print

A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Creator: Unknown

A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Man smoking a pipe, and a Blenkinsop steam locomotive at Middleton colliery near Leeds, West Yorkshire. Mining engineer and inventor John Blenkinsop (1783-1831) designed the first practicable steam locomotive, the Salamanca, in 1812. It operated by means of a rack and pinion system. Richard Trevithick had built a steam locomotive in 1805 for Wylam colliery, but it had been too heavy for the cast iron rails it was meant to run on. Middleton colliery laid iron edge rails, which were stronger than those used at Wylam. Blenkinsop went on to build three further locomotives for the colliery, which carried on operating on the railway into the 1830s. In the meantime, further improvements in rail design meant that heavier adhesion locomotives could be used, superseding Blenkinsop's rack and pinion engines. From "British Railways", by Arthur Elton. [Collins, London, 1945]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Volunteer going to retrieve bodies in the Gresford Colliery disaster, Wales, 1935 Featured Print

Volunteer going to retrieve bodies in the Gresford Colliery disaster, Wales, 1935

Volunteer going to retrieve bodies in the Gresford Colliery disaster, Wales, 1935. A man with a gas mask recieving last-minute instructions. Heroes of the Coal Mines: on 22 September 1934, occurred on of the worst disasters in mining history, when nearly 300 miners lost their lives...After the explosion which caused the tragedy, the gas fumes were so deadly that 254 bodies still in the pit could not be rescued, and the pit had to be sealed up. On 7 March 1935, volunteers who had been especially trained, descended into the death pit to report conditions. Here is one of these men, who risked his life to reclaim his comrades bodies'. From "The Silver Jubilee Book - The Story of 25 Eventful Years in Pictures". [Odhams Press Ltd., London, 1935]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Sappers and miners at work, Ypres salient, Belgium, World War I, c1915-c1917. Artist: Realistic Travels Publishers Featured Print

Sappers and miners at work, Ypres salient, Belgium, World War I, c1915-c1917. Artist: Realistic Travels Publishers

Sappers and miners at work, Ypres salient, Belgium, World War I, c1915-c1917. Digging a tunnel under Hill 60. Hill 60 was a strategically important high point on the southern edge of the Ypres salient that had been captured by the Germans in 1914 as they advanced towards the sea. The Germans were dislodged from the hill in April 1915 after British engineers detonated exposives placed in tunnels dug into the hill, but recaptured it following a gas attack the following month. Australian troops took over mining operations at Hill 60 in November 1916 and on 7 June 1917, at the beginning of the Battle of Messines, they set off 450, 000 kg of explosives in 19 tunnels. A large part of the hill was destroyed and 10, 000 Germans killed in their trenches in an explosion that was said to have been heard and felt as far away as London and even Dublin. Stereoscopic card. Detail

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images