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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Chemist Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 199 pictures in our Chemist collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


J. Watt, (1736-1819), 1830. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

J. Watt, (1736-1819), 1830. Creator: Unknown

J. Watt, (1736-1819),1830. James Watt (1736-1819) Scottish inventor, mechanical engineer, and chemist, home educated. He improved the Newcomen steam engine, entered partnership with Matthew Boulton and was fundamental to changes brought by the Industrial Revolution. From "Biographical Illustrations", by Alfred Howard. [Thomas Tegg, R. Griffin and Co., J. Cumming, London, Glasgow and Dublin, 1830]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Interior of the Rotunda, Blackfriars Road, in 1820, (c1878). Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Interior of the Rotunda, Blackfriars Road, in 1820, (c1878). Creator: Unknown

Interior of the Rotunda, Blackfriars Road, in 1820, (c1878). German chemist Friedrich Accum (1769-1838) lecturing at the Surrey Institution in Southwark, south London. The building, dating from 1787, was used for various different purposes. It initially housed the collection of the Leverian Museum, and the Rotunda radicals met there in the early 1830s. From Old and New London: A Narrative of Its History, Its People, And Its Places. The Southern Suburbs, Volume VI, by Edward Walford. [Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., London, Paris & New York, c1878]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Joseph Wilson Swan, British physicist and chemist, demonstrating electromagnetism, 1889 Featured Print

Joseph Wilson Swan, British physicist and chemist, demonstrating electromagnetism, 1889

Joseph Wilson Swan, British physicist and chemist, demonstrating electromagnetism, 1889. Swan (1828-1914) was the inventor of bromide paper for photography and of an incandescent light bulb. He is shown here at a Royal Society Conversazione, on 8 May 1889, demonstrating that a metal ring wound with a coil of wire rotates in the Earth's magnetic field when a small electric current is applied. From The Illustrated London News. (London, 1889). (Colorised black and white print)

© The Print Collector