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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Ceremonial Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 403 pictures in our Ceremonial collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Prince Edward of Wales, the future King Edward VII of Great Britain (1841-1910), 1890.Artist: W&D Downey Featured Print

Prince Edward of Wales, the future King Edward VII of Great Britain (1841-1910), 1890.Artist: W&D Downey

Prince Edward of Wales, the future King Edward VII of Great Britain and Ireland (1841-1910), 1890. Edward VII was King of Great Britain between 1901 and 1910. Before his accession to the throne, Edward held the title of Prince of Wales, and has the distinction of having been heir apparent to the throne longer than anyone in English or British history. During the long widowhood of his mother, Queen Victoria, he was largely excluded from wielding any political power but came to represent the personification of the fashionable, leisured elite. Edward's reign saw the first official recognition of the office of the Prime Minister in 1905 and he was the first British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, which was renamed by his son, George V, as the House of Windsor

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

The altar of the new church of St. Giles. Camberwell - ceremony of consecration, 1844 Featured Print

The altar of the new church of St. Giles. Camberwell - ceremony of consecration, 1844

The altar of the new church of St. Giles. Camberwell - ceremony of consecration, 1844. Solemn dedication of a newly built church in south London. This magnificent structure...was consecrated by the Lord Bishop of Winchester [Charles Sumner]...the sermon (a very excellent discourse) from the 12th chapter of Deuteronomy, v. 5, was preached by his Lordship the Bishop'. The church ...is built of Whitby stone and stone from Caen, in Normandy, in the style of the time of Edward II., when the decorative manner began to be ingrafted on the plainer English Gothic of the earlier ages. The architects are Messrs. Scott and Moffatt, of whom it would be unjust not to say that they have rescued modern church building from the reproach of want of taste and architectural authority, which some recent edifices had brought upon it'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol V

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Ancient ceremony of Chopping Sticks, and Counting Horse-shoes and Hob-nails...1844 Featured Print

Ancient ceremony of Chopping Sticks, and Counting Horse-shoes and Hob-nails...1844

Ancient ceremony of Chopping Sticks, and Counting Horse-shoes and Hob-nails, in the Court of the Exchequer, 1844. London aldermen performing a traditional custom: ...an officer of the Court handed to him a bill-hook; the officer then took a small bundle of sticks...whilst the Alderman struck it and cut it asunder. The bill-hook was then exchanged for a small hatchet, and a similar bundle of sticks cut in like manner...the Alderman, having first counted certain horseshoes placed upon a table, and declared their number, a tray was handed to him containing a number of hob-nails, which he also counted...The senior Alderman, in fact, does suit and service for the tenants of a manor in Shropshire, by chopping the sticks in token of its having been customary for the tenants of that manor to supply their lord with fuel. The counting of the horse-shoes and nails is another suit and service of the owners of a forge in the parish of St. Clement...'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol V

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images