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Calculator Gallery

Available as Prints and Gift Items

Choose from 8 pictures in our Calculator collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Circular Slide Rule, William J. Powell, 1935. Creator: Unknown
Circular Slide Rule, William J. Powell, 1935. Creator: Unknown
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Computer, Weems E-1B Navigational. Creator: Weems System of Navigation
Computer, Weems E-1B Navigational. Creator: Weems System of Navigation
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Dead reckoning computer owned by Sally Ride. Creator: Telex Communications Inc
Dead reckoning computer owned by Sally Ride. Creator: Telex Communications Inc
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Clerk using a Pascal adding machine, 1835
Clerk using a Pascal adding machine, 1835
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Super calculating machine, 1938
Super calculating machine, 1938
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Charles Babbages Difference Engine No 1, prototype calculating machine, 1824-1832. Artist: Joseph Clement
Charles Babbages Difference Engine No 1, prototype calculating machine, 1824-1832. Artist: Joseph Clement
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Pascals digital counting machine of 1642, 1751-1780
Pascals digital counting machine of 1642, 1751-1780
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
George and Edward Scheutzs calculating machine
George and Edward Scheutzs calculating machine
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Dead reckoning computer owned by Sally Ride. Creator: Telex Communications Inc Featured Image

Dead reckoning computer owned by Sally Ride. Creator: Telex Communications Inc

This TELEX E-6B dead reckoning computer belonged to Dr. Sally K. Ride. It is a circular slide rule used in aviation for calculating factors such as fuel burn, wind correction, ground speed, and estimated time of arrival. As a mission specialist astronaut, Ride was not responsible for piloting the space shuttle, but as part of her training she was expected to spend fifteen hours a month aloft in the backseat of a T-38 jet. These flights allowed Ride to practice navigation and communication procedures while also being conditioned for high-performance flight. Sally Ride became the first American woman in space when she flew on the STS-7 shuttle mission in 1983

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