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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Babylonia Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 97 pictures in our Babylonia collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Pre-Persian, circa 600 B.C., c1915. Creator: Emery Walker Ltd Featured Print

Pre-Persian, circa 600 B.C., c1915. Creator: Emery Walker Ltd

Pre-Persian, circa 600 B.C., c1915. Map of the eastern Mediterranean and near East, showing the ancient civilisations of empires of Lydia, Media, Babylonia, Independent States, and free Greek cities. From "The Caliphs Last Heritage, a short history of the Turkish Empire" by Lt.-Col. Sir Mark Sykes. [Macmillan & Co, London, 1915]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Ivory inlay from Nimrud Featured Print

Ivory inlay from Nimrud

Ivory inlay from Nimrud. One of the two identical pieces of which one is in the British Museum and the other was in Iraq, now missing. A lioness springs at a Nubian who falls back as the lioness closes its jaws on his throat. The background pattern incorporates Egyptian lotus. Culture: Phoenician. Date/Period: Last third of 8th century. Place of Origin: Nimrud, Assyria, Ancient Iraq. Material Size: Ivory. Credit Line: Werner Forman Archive/ Iraq Museum, Baghdad . Location: 16

© Werner Forman Archive / Heritage-Images

A polychrome glazed brick from the Ishtar at Babylon, c570 BC. Artist: Werner Forman Featured Print

A polychrome glazed brick from the Ishtar at Babylon, c570 BC. Artist: Werner Forman

A polychrome glazed brick from the Ishtar at Babylon, c570 BC. The Ishtar Gate was constructed during the time of Nebuchadnezzar II. It led into the city of Babylon via the Processional Way, along which statues of the Babylonian gods were paraded during New Year celebrations. The dog-like dragon, similar to those of Iranian mythology of about 2000 BC, is said to be the Murussu dragon, personal symbol of Marduk, the champion of the gods. From the State Museum, Berlin

© Werner Forman Archive/ State Museum, Berlin / Heritage-Images