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Captain James Cook taking possession of New South Wales in the name of the British Crown, 1770 Featured Image

Captain James Cook taking possession of New South Wales in the name of the British Crown, 1770

Captain James Cook taking possession of New South Wales in the name of the British Crown, 1770. James Cook (1728-1779), English explorer, navigator and hydrographer, made three voyages of discovery. On the first he observed the transit of Venus and charted the coasts of New Zealand and eastern Australia, claiming them for Britain, and on the second he explored the Southern Ocean. The main objective of his last voyage was to find a northern sea passage between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. He was killed when a fight broke out with natives in Hawaii

© Ann Ronan Picture Library / Heritage-Images

Albert Frederick Calvert in the Alhambra, Granada, Spain, 1907. Creator: Unknown Featured Image

Albert Frederick Calvert in the Alhambra, Granada, Spain, 1907. Creator: Unknown

Albert Frederick Calvert in the Alhambra, Granada, Spain, 1907. Portrait of
Australian traveller and author Calvert (1872-1946) wearing oriental dress and smoking a huqqa, in the palace of the Alhambra, which mainly dates from the 14th century. From his "The Alhambra: being a brief record of the Arabian conquest of the Peninsula with a particular account of the Mohammedan architecture and decoration". [John Lane, London & New York, 1907]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

The Northern Party at the South Magnetic Pole, 17 January 1909 Featured Image

The Northern Party at the South Magnetic Pole, 17 January 1909

The Northern Party at the South Magnetic Pole from Left - Dr. Mackay, Professor David, Douglas Mawson, 17 January 1909. Anglo-Irish explorer Ernest Shackleton (1874-1922) made three expeditions to the Antarctic. During the second expedition, 1907-1909, Alastair Mackay, Edgeworth David, and Douglas Mawson reached the Southern Magnetic Pole. Unlike the geographic South Pole, the magnetic South Pole is not a fixed point, but wanders over the surface of the Earth as the magnetic field surrounding the planet fluctuates. In 1909, it was still accessible over land. Shackleton and three companions also established a new record, Farthest South latitude at 88°S, only 97 geographical miles (112 statute miles, or 180 km) from the South Pole, the largest advance to the pole in exploration history. Illustration from The Heart of the Antarctic, Vol. I, by E. H. Shackleton, C.V.O. [William Heinemann, London, 1909]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images


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