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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Atkinson Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 56 pictures in our Atkinson collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


'Dr. Atkinson and Clissold Hauling Up The Fish-Trap', 28 May 1911, (1913). Artist Featured Print

'Dr. Atkinson and Clissold Hauling Up The Fish-Trap', 28 May 1911, (1913). Artist

'Dr. Atkinson and Clissold Hauling Up The Fish-Trap, (photographed in the midst of the long winter night by flashlight, in a temperature 40 degrees below zero Fah.)', 28 May 1911, (1913). Dr Edward Atkinson (1881-1929), the expedition's doctor, and cook Thomas Clissold pulling up a fish trap from below the ice, where fish are able to survive. The fish would have instantly frozen to death as the trap was brought out of the water into the air. The final expedition of British Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) left London on 1 June 1910 bound for the South Pole. The Terra Nova Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-1913), included a geologist, a zoologist, a surgeon, a photographer, an engineer, a ski expert, a meteorologist and a physicist among others. Scott wished to continue the scientific work that he had begun when leading the Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04. He also wanted to be the first to reach the geographic South Pole. Scott, accompanied by Dr Edward Wilson, Captain Lawrence Oates, Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Petty Officer Edgar Evans, reached the Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that the Norwegian expedition under Amundsen had beaten them to their objective by a month. Delayed by blizzards, and running out of supplies, Scott and the remainder of his team died at the end of March. Their bodies and diaries were found eight months later. From Scott's Last Expedition, Volume I. [Smith, Elder & Co., London, 1913]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

'The Main Party at Cape Evans After The Winter, 1911', (1913). Artist: Herbert Ponting Featured Print

'The Main Party at Cape Evans After The Winter, 1911', (1913). Artist: Herbert Ponting

'The Main Party at Cape Evans After The Winter, 1911', (1913). 'Mr. Taylor. Mr. Cherry-Garrard. Mr. Day. Mr. Nelson. Lieut. Evans. Capt. Oates. Dr. Atkinson. Capt. Scott. Mr. Wright. Lieut. Gran. Keohane. Lashly. Hooper. Forde. Anton. Demetri. Lieut. Bowers. Mr. Meares. Mr. Debenham. Dr. Wilson. Dr. Simpson. Seaman Evans. Crean.' The final expedition of British Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) left London on 1 June 1910 bound for the South Pole. The Terra Nova Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-1913), included a geologist, a zoologist, a surgeon, a photographer, an engineer, a ski expert, a meteorologist and a physicist among others. Scott wished to continue the scientific work that he had begun when leading the Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04. He also wanted to be the first to reach the geographic South Pole. Scott, accompanied by Dr Edward Wilson, Captain Lawrence Oates, Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Petty Officer Edgar Evans, reached the Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that the Norwegian expedition under Amundsen had beaten them to their objective by a month. Delayed by blizzards, and running out of supplies, Scott and the remainder of his team died at the end of March. Their bodies and diaries were found eight months later. From Scott's Last Expedition, Volume I. [Smith, Elder & Co., London, 1913]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

'Queen Victoria and Lord Melbourne', 1911. Artist: George Atkinson Featured Print

'Queen Victoria and Lord Melbourne', 1911. Artist: George Atkinson

'Queen Victoria and Lord Melbourne', 1911. Prime Minister, the Whig Lord Melbourne, with 18-year-old Queen Victoria. He instructed her on political problems of the day, the workings of Parliament and the Cabinet, and on the mysteries of the constitution. From The Connoisseur Vol XXIX. [Otto Limited, London, 1911]

© The Print Collector