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Air Mail Gallery

Available as Prints and Gift Items

Choose from 6 pictures in our Air Mail collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Douglas M-2, 1936. Creator: Douglas Aircraft Company
Douglas M-2, 1936. Creator: Douglas Aircraft Company
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
5c Buffalo Balloon imperforate vertical pair, 1877. Creator: Unknown
5c Buffalo Balloon imperforate vertical pair, 1877. Creator: Unknown
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
The first Indian Air Mail arrives at Croydon Airport, south London, 1929, (1935)
The first Indian Air Mail arrives at Croydon Airport, south London, 1929, (1935)
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Loading mails on board an Imperial Airways liner at Croydon Airport, c1936 (c1937). Artist: GPO
Loading mails on board an Imperial Airways liner at Croydon Airport, c1936 (c1937). Artist: GPO
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Before the first flight over Mount Everest, 1933 (c1937)
Before the first flight over Mount Everest, 1933 (c1937)
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Jean Mermoz, French pilot, 1935
Jean Mermoz, French pilot, 1935
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
5c Buffalo Balloon imperforate vertical pair, 1877. Creator: Unknown Featured Image

5c Buffalo Balloon imperforate vertical pair, 1877. Creator: Unknown

5c Buffalo Balloon imperforate vertical pair, 1877. Perhaps the most enigmatic of all American stamps, the Buffalo balloon stamp is certainly among the premier rarities in aerophilately. Since it was privately issued for use with a standard U.S. postal service 3-cent stamp to pay for air handling of a mailed piece, it was (if one includes both private and government issues) the world's first airmail stamp. The stamp is an accurate representation of the enormous 92,000 cubic foot "Buffalo" balloon of Professor Samuel Archer King (1828-1914), and was designed by John B. Lillard, a clerk in the Wheeler firm and a passenger on the great flight. Interestingly, the engraver of the stamp was John H. Snively, a scientist who provided apparatus for experiments on the flight. The stamps were printed tete-beche format--that is, they are shown right side up and upside down below on one sheet. It is likely that in printing the stamp, one side was printed, and then the sheet was taken out and turned round and fed back in the press to produce a mirror image of the first row

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