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Accuracy Gallery

Available as Prints and Gift Items

Choose from 7 pictures in our Accuracy collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


British soldiers synchronising their watches on the front line, First World War, 1914-1918, (1933)
British soldiers synchronising their watches on the front line, First World War, 1914-1918, (1933)
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Less accurate than William Tell, 1929. Creator: Unknown
Less accurate than William Tell, 1929. Creator: Unknown
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
A Good Shot!, c1820, (1922). Artist: Abraham Cooper
A Good Shot!, c1820, (1922). Artist: Abraham Cooper
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Measured Drawing of the Near Fore-Leg of a Horse, c1480 (1945). Artist: Leonardo da Vinci
Measured Drawing of the Near Fore-Leg of a Horse, c1480 (1945). Artist: Leonardo da Vinci
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Studies of Horses Fore-Legs and Measured Drawings of Horses Heads, c1480 (1945). Artist: Leonardo da Vinci
Studies of Horses Fore-Legs and Measured Drawings of Horses Heads, c1480 (1945). Artist: Leonardo da Vinci
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Measured Drawing of a Horse in Profile to the Left, c1480 (1945). Artist: Leonardo da Vinci
Measured Drawing of a Horse in Profile to the Left, c1480 (1945). Artist: Leonardo da Vinci
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Method of laying an artillery piece on target using Gunners scale, 18th century
Method of laying an artillery piece on target using Gunners scale, 18th century
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
British soldiers synchronising their watches on the front line, First World War, 1914-1918, (1933) Featured Image

British soldiers synchronising their watches on the front line, First World War, 1914-1918, (1933)

British soldiers synchronising their watches on the front line, First World War, 1914-1918, (1933). Punctuality was no longer the "Courtesy of Kings" in Edward VII's phrase, but the "Safety of Soldiers"...all camps had a post surmounted by a clock by which all troops regulated their watches. In France before an attack, watches were synchronised to obtain unanimity of movement and perfect co-operation at zero hour - the name given to the moment of attack. From "The Pageant of the Century". [Odhams Press Ltd, 1933]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images