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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

6th Century Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 261 pictures in our 6th Century collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Pottery cremation urn, from a grave at Loveden Hill, Lincolnshire, Anglo-Saxon, 6th-7th century Featured Print

Pottery cremation urn, from a grave at Loveden Hill, Lincolnshire, Anglo-Saxon, 6th-7th century

Pottery cremation urn, from a cremation grave in a cemetery at Loveden Hill, Lincolnshire, Anglo-Saxon, 6th-7th century. The urn is decorated with deeply incised chevrons which are filled with horizontally set impressions of a stamp, producing four circular depressions perhaps made with a fragment of a bone comb. Currently in the British Museum

© CM Dixon / Heritage-Images

St. Gowans Head and Chapel, 1898. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

St. Gowans Head and Chapel, 1898. Creator: Unknown

St. Gowan's Head and Chapel, 1898. Grade I listed St Govan's Chapel at St Govan's Head, Pembrokeshire Wales built into the side of a limestone cliff during 13th century, although parts date back to 6th century inhabitation by Saint Govan. From "Our Own Country, Volume VI". [Cassell and Company, Limited, London, Paris & Melbourne, 1898]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Icon of the Virgin and Child, 500s. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Icon of the Virgin and Child, 500s. Creator: Unknown

Icon of the Virgin and Child, 500s. This tapestry glorifying the Virgin Mary is among the rarest objects in the museum's collection. In a composition borrowed from imperial Byzantine art, Mary is shown seated on a jeweled throne with the Christ child and flanked by archangels Michael and Gabriel. Above, Christ appears in a radiant light supported by two angels. Portraits of the apostles, identified in Greek, appear in the surrounding wreath symbolizing eternal life. This portable sacred textile was presumably displayed at the front of a public or private place of worship. This unique tapestry is one of the earliest Christian icons to survive. Woven icons were among the miraculous works shown to pilgrims in Jerusalem according to Abbot Adomnan of Iona (about 624-704) who described a linen cloth "said to have been woven by Saint Mary, and is for this reason preserved in a church and venerated by the whole population. Pictures of the twelve apostles are woven into it, and there is also a portrait of the Lord." The abbot's description of the woven icon suggests it must have been similar to the tapestry displayed here. The delicate effects of shading in the facial features, garments, and vegetation were achieved by weaving the panel sideways with at least 20 colours, just as medieval tapestry weavers did centuries later in Europe. The high cost of dyes caused this majestic icon to be far costlier than painted images

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images